1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Steel Thickness For Paring/petty Knife, 15n20 Heatreat Question

Discussion in 'Steel, Hardware, & Handle Material' started by SDMay, Sep 18, 2016.

  1. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

    Likes Received:
    77
    Trophy Points:
    28
    As with most mass produced knives all of my paring knives are of 1/16 or less stock. I am going to make some petty style knives, hopefully with a matching chef knife, for Christmas for a few people. The thinnest that 1084 is available in is 1/8.. Is this too thick for the smaller knife as i would like for them to be used like a standard paring knife for peeling things like apples and potatoes? I would like to make both out of the same steel if possible but the idea of hogging 1/8 down to 1/16 and keeping it even by hand doesn't sound like fun.

    Also I am wondering if anyone has used 15N20 by itself. I looked up the heat treating info on Alpha Knife Supply and it seems to be even more straight forward then 1084 as there is no soak time. If so then I can use this for the petty and 5/32 1084 for the chef like I had wanted.

    Thanks,
    Shawn
     
  2. Prevenge

    Prevenge Member

    Likes Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Taking off 1/16 on something small sounds easy compared to what I have been working on...especially when using already flat stock and not something that has been drastically forged ;) Thats where one of those 4x36 jalopies with a big magnet to hold the blank would come in handy as a hobo surface grinder. Or if you have a 1x30 combo do lots of quick passes and maybe true it up with the disc portion?
     
    SDMay likes this.
  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    653
    Trophy Points:
    113
    15N20 will work well enough tried it on a fillet knife myself and it worked well.
    Right now doing a couple knives in AEB-L but that heat treating is more involved
     
    SDMay likes this.
  4. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I have done kitchen and paring knives in 15N20 with good results. I has a bunch in .070 i believe that was left from a damascus project. No issues with them so far and the people who own them have reported great performance. 1/8 stock left full thickness would be too thick in my opinion, and hoging it down would be a pain, and probably a waste of good steel. I would save the 1/8 for some hunters and pick up some thin 15N20 or even 1095 for the paring knives. I had a batch of .070 1095 i used for some fillet knives as well. both options would be cheaper than grinding down the more expensive thicker 1084.
     
    SDMay likes this.
  5. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

    Likes Received:
    77
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I have some 0.065 15N20 ordered. Should be here in the next day or two. I'll give it a shot and let everyone know where I end up.

    Thanks for the help folks. Love this forum as I get way more info out of it then any of the "bigger" ones.
     
  6. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    653
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Tried 0.06" AEB-L on a chef knife for myself, tricky stuff was being aggravating in that the grind never seemed to be working right. Found out I had either bent the heel of the knife or it warped as I ground, the joys of working thin steel.

    It is not pretty but the scales go on and I will be putting it to good use.
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

    Likes Received:
    1,200
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I like 3/32" for small paring or petty knives. Full flat and distal taper. I don't suspect that is a common thickness in 10xx steels, however taking it down 1/32" is more like removing the mill scale. :)
     
  8. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    653
    Trophy Points:
    113
    for the thinner materials (3/16") and thinner it is all gauge dimensions
    [​IMG]
     
  9. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

    Likes Received:
    1,200
    Trophy Points:
    113
    My friend Peter at Metal Supermarket says "Gauges drive me crazy! Every metal has some different thickness for the same gauge."

    They prefer to use decimal inches. Luckily, carbon and cutlery steel alloys are in decimal inches or mm.

    Dan
     

Share This Page