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Something new, a "Piggy-back" Hunting set (photo heavy)

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by J. Neilson, Sep 6, 2013.

  1. J. Neilson

    J. Neilson New Member

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    Hello All,
    I hope everyone is doing well. Here is something I’ve been working on for the fall hunting season, I hope you like it.
    Thanks again,
    J.


    "Piggy-back Hunter Set" in Multi-dyed Burl​
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    This pair of full-tang Hunters will cover a lot of bases. The larger, "main knife" of the set is forged from 52100 high carbon steel and has my "antiqued" finish for ease of maintenance and no-shine qualities. The knife is 10 1/4" overall with a 5 1/8" cutting edge. The handle scales are multi-dyed and stabilized A-grade burl wood done in a "palm swell" style. The handle has a "coffin" profile and is secured with two stainless steel handle bolts and a matching lanyard liner. The smaller "side knife" matches the larger knife in all ways except it is forged from 1084 high carbon steel, everything else mimics the larger knife including the handle scales coming from the same block of wood. This smaller one has an overall length of 7 1/4" and a 3 3/8" cutting edge. The fixed "piggy back" sheath by Chuck Dominick at Chuddy Bear Leather is fully textured in two-tone leather with a belt loop and the blades are secured in the sheath with rare earth magnets as well as the fit.​


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  2. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Very nice work. I have really been digging the piggyback sets lately and this pair is great.
     
  3. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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    Beautiful pair J!!! I really like the way the antiqued finish compliment those scales. Keep up the great work!!!
     
  4. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Great stuff! I can't find anything about them I don't like. The blade finish is really nice.
     
  5. J. Neilson

    J. Neilson New Member

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    Thanks guys. It's funny, I started doing that blade finish about 6 or so years ago for military folks and when I took it to the knife shows, everyone told me how ugly it was for a whole year before it caught on. Now I do way more "antiqued" finish blades than hand-rubbed. ; )
     
  6. Jim T

    Jim T Active Member

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    Man, those are nice, J! - Jim T
     
  7. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    Very nice set. I would like to know your process for getting that great looking patina on the blades
     
  8. Alexander13

    Alexander13 Member

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    Awesome, I really like the finish on the blades!
     
  9. J. Neilson

    J. Neilson New Member

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    You've got it Brad.

    I appreciate the comments guys, thanks.
    J.
     
  10. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    Thanks for the information J. Hopefully I can put it to good use this weekend.
     
  11. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    care to share ?
     
  12. J. Neilson

    J. Neilson New Member

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    No sweat, it's actually pretty easy. You can finish your
    blade up to a 400 grit finish and then coat it with plain yellow (cheap)
    mustard. I usually coat the blade and then us a Popsicle stick to add
    "highs & lows" to the mustard (kinda lightly smack the blade with
    the stick). You can let the mustard sit on the blade for as long as you like
    (I’ve left it on for as long as 2 weeks). If you leave the mustard on
    overnight, you'll have a good dark finish. The longer you leave the mustard on,
    the more patterning you will have on the finished project. Once you're ready to
    move on, take Clorox bleach and heat the bleach to just below boiling (do this
    wearing a respirator and in a well ventilated area) and put the blade in,
    mustard and all. Leave the blade in the bleach for approx. 3 min., then pull
    the blade out and scrub it down with course steel wool (it'll look like the
    blade is rusting before your eyes). Now put the blade back in the bleach and
    repeat this process 4-8 times, depending on how dark you want your blade. Once
    you have achieved the depth of finish you want, put the blade into baking
    soda/water and boil it for 15-20 min. to neutralize the blade, otherwise it
    will continue to "rust". That's it, your good to go with a cool
    looking, non-reflective finish that requires almost no effort to maintain.
    Also, to date, I have used this same method on 1080-84-95, 5160, 52100, O1,
    15N20, M4 & L6 with very good results.


    I hope this helps,
    J.
     

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