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Small Hunter in progress

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by knifeaholic92, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. knifeaholic92

    knifeaholic92 New Member

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    Hey guys!

    here's a small S30V hunter that I got back from heat treat a couple days ago! I still have to improve my hand sanding finish (and as a matter of fact I'd take any advices :) ) but here it is.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Grouch

    Grouch Active Member

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    I really like that design. What kind of wood is that?
     
  3. knifeaholic92

    knifeaholic92 New Member

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    it's stabilized walnut :) unfortunately i off-centered one of the brass pins, but as a second knife it's not so bad I think!
     
  4. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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    Very nice... I really like that profile for a drop point looks like it would be very comfortable to handle.
     
  5. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    its a great second knife , what was your questions re sanding ? grits ? sequence ?
     
  6. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    I don't know what advice you are looking for specifically on hand sanding but I have a few things I can offer that have helped me a lot. The biggest thing to remember is not to skip any grits, and to stay at each grit until all the scratches from the previous grit are gone. We have a tendency to rush and think those last few scratches will come out at a higher grit, a 150 grit scratch left after 220 isn't going to go away at 400 without a huge amount of wasted time and paper. I use a sanding block made from paper micarta so it is dead flat, this gives and even finish. And eliminates dips and waves that would come from too soft or narrow of a backing piece. Alternate angles on each grit and it will be easy to see when to move on as old scratches will show clearly. I start by going tip to plunge, then the next grit I will go 45 degrees to that scratch pattern, then back to straight on the next grit. If your bevel is a bit uneven or wavy off the belt or files, start 45 degrees rather than tip to tang, as there is less chance of the block following the dips and simply making them deeper. For a hand rubbed finish, I suggest going a grit high, then stepping back. If you want a 400 grit hand rub, sand to 600 and the. Step back to 400 for the hand rub. For a hand rub, touch down and the plunge, and pull to the tip, don't move back and forth or it creates j hooks that will be visible. It also helps to have a softer backing behind the paper on the last step, such as a piece of firm leather or gasket material. Lastly, use sandpaper like its free, because it's not worth your time using dull or plugged paper. Windex also makes a great sanding lube and helps the paper cut longer and cleaner.

    Nick wheeler has an awesome hand sanding video on his YouTube channel that should be mandatory material for any knifemaker in my opinion.
     
  7. knifeaholic92

    knifeaholic92 New Member

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    Thanks a lot Grazyer! I'll be looking into that for sure
     

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