1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Second Knife

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by Olivier L'Heureux, Aug 9, 2017.

  1. Olivier L'Heureux

    Olivier L'Heureux New Member

    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Hi there!

    So after a bit of experimentation and a lot of notsogreat knives let me present you my second knife i'm proud of (at least enough to show you ^^)

    The blade is made from an old ferrier's rasp (I know, steel is not so great but it is reasonnably hard) and the handle from black walnut.

    I've also refined my marking technique a littlebit ^^ still redneck but the mark is cleaner and deeper than before.

    All comments, tips and tricks, insults and indignation screams are welcome ^^


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    PeterP, Chezzetcooker, Eric B and 4 others like this.
  2. ConnorBC

    ConnorBC Active Member

    Likes Received:
    118
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Looks great Olivier! Is this really just your second blade?!

    Your makers mark looks like you've been making it for a good long while, what would make you believe it "redneck"? lol
     
    Olivier L'Heureux likes this.
  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    620
    Trophy Points:
    113
    looking good for number two. You need to break out the sandpaper and touch up the heel of the blade a little, making the radius smooth and getting the scratches gone makes a huge difference in appearance especially in a close up photo.
     
    Olivier L'Heureux likes this.
  4. Olivier L'Heureux

    Olivier L'Heureux New Member

    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Thanks ^^ Technically this is my... lets see.. fifth knife. But on those there are only two I find good enough and finished enough to show : the others are either ugly or not hardened.
    And the mark is etched. With a car battery powerpack and some salted water : this is the "redneck" part ^^

    And yeah, I know for the heel. There's a good two hours of handsanding involved but no matter how hard I tried I've not been able to get thoses marks out... the rest of the blade is perfectly smooth but that last half inch i've no idea how i'll be able to get it cleaned up
     
  5. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    620
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I had a couple hours in hand sanding and down to two deep scratches that would not go away. Ended up spending some time with a 400 grit belt before they were gone, trying not to change the blade shape to much. It is never fun when you get that far and find canyons :roflmao

    On knife way to many and still get the odd scratch like those and figure time to toss the belt because something must be stuck in it.
     
    Olivier L'Heureux likes this.
  6. Kevin MacPherson

    Kevin MacPherson Member

    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Looks good. great looking handle too
     
    Olivier L'Heureux likes this.
  7. propane_cooker

    propane_cooker New Member

    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    That turned out really nice. I have the same issue with scratches from my file, hours of sanding but can't get the marks out. Did you anneal the file before working on it? That handle looks great, what did you do to finish it? I really like walnut and will probably be using it quite a bit. Your makers mark looks excellent, looked good on your first knife too. That is something that I would like to add to my knives. Did you use a stencil for it? How did you do it?
     
    Olivier L'Heureux likes this.
  8. Jewett

    Jewett New Member

    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    3
    looks awesome man!
     
    Olivier L'Heureux likes this.
  9. Olivier L'Heureux

    Olivier L'Heureux New Member

    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Thanks you all ^^

    propane_cooker, I did not annealed the file beforehand, but i did forged it, so I guess it did annealed itself between sessions. If you want to grind your knife with stock removal be sure to do it before otherwise you'll go trough sandpaper like cray ^^ To finish the handle I first did a layer of boiled linseed oil, and then a few layers of Cyanoacrylate (superglue) to stabilize the wood.

    I made my mark with salt-water etching (). I did used a stencil instead of Nail polish (it is waaaaaay more accurate) but i'm lucky enough to have access to a vinyl cutter at my job. You can have them made tough if i'm not mistaken.
     
  10. propane_cooker

    propane_cooker New Member

    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Sorry Oliver, I didn't realize you had forged it. That makes it even more impressive. How did you harden it after forging? Your first knife that you posted here must have been forged as well? I will have to find someone to make some vinyl stencils for me, I'm pretty redneck but I don't want to put something ugly on a nice finished knife.
     
  11. Olivier L'Heureux

    Olivier L'Heureux New Member

    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Thank you again ^^ no, the first knife I posted was stock ground. I tried to quench this one in oil after I heated it up to critical temperature (non-magnetic) but it did not harden so I tried to quench it in water... Picked up qute a warp but it was hard ^^ I got most of the deformation away by carefully forcing the blade while it was still hot, and the rest by grinding it. now it is barely noticable.
     
  12. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    620
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Some brands of file are a case hardened steel apparently so they are lower in the carbon and will withstand a water or brine quench. The whole warping thing is variations in the cross section from side to side and tiny amounts can move the steel a surprising amount.
     
  13. Olivier L'Heureux

    Olivier L'Heureux New Member

    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Yeah, after I began grinding I noticed that one side was... thicker than the other. Specially in the Tang. So this is all that may cause warping? as long as everything is centered and even everything should stay straight?
     
  14. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    620
    Trophy Points:
    113
    If everything is even then technically no reason for uneven shrinking on cooling or warping. You should see how far you can curve a steel beam with a bit of uneven heating same basic principle and pretty impressive actually.
     
    Olivier L'Heureux likes this.
  15. Olivier L'Heureux

    Olivier L'Heureux New Member

    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I do have a question for you in that case : How do you quench a knife That have a chisel ground ? Technically with that grind your bound to have a side with more mass than the other. How do you avoid warping ?
     
  16. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    620
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I did a small chisel grind out of T1 steel and hardened by plate quenching. Now for something that has to be oil quenched I would quench to just under 600F or just below the nose of the CCT diagram then clamp between two plates. From that point cool with high pressure and volume air, should harden properly and keep things 95% straight
     
    Olivier L'Heureux likes this.
  17. Olivier L'Heureux

    Olivier L'Heureux New Member

    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Could you describe to me what a plate quench is ? It's the first time I hear the term...
     
    propane_cooker likes this.
  18. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    620
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Think of it as a knife sandwich, plate on bottom much larger than the knife, place knife on top and another plate on top of that.

    clamp lightly and hit with compressed air in the gap to help with cooling. Generally you want to be able to hold the knife in a minute for proper quenching speed.

    Plates:
    Best is copper
    2nd is aluminum
    Both will work so don't stress over which ones you can get
     
    propane_cooker likes this.
  19. Kevin MacPherson

    Kevin MacPherson Member

    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Like John says Compressed air is likely best however I use aluminum plates and a high velocity fan and it cools in less than a minute where you can handle it with your bare hands. I put a 10 lb weight on the top plate and I haven't had any issues with warping yet although I have only done about 10 blades with this method. So far so good.
     
  20. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    262
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Heheh... he said "number two"... ( I know, I can't help it - I'm still only 10 years old on the inside)
     

Share This Page