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New Skinner....

Discussion in 'Folders' started by PeterP, Jan 2, 2016.

  1. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    Hi Guys, well this one was a challenge! First attempt at a skinner.
    01 steel for blade and bolsters, back end bolster is two layers with copper inlay.
    Scales are white deer and ..I guess brown tail antlers.
    pins are brass. I have been working on this piece for two weeks now and still have some etching to do on the blade with clients logo.
    Now on to the leather work.
    Hope you guys like it.
    Cheers
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    That's pretty cool.
     
  3. krash-bang

    krash-bang Active Member

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    That looks really nice. Love the look of it.
     
  4. Grizz Axxemann

    Grizz Axxemann Active Member

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  5. Chris Roy

    Chris Roy Active Member

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    Very cool profile. love the shape.Nice work
     
  6. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    If i may offer some advice, whatever it may be worth, there are a few points i will touch on. The overall profile and material selection is nice, i am a fan of natural materials and a big fan of copper. As for the handle layup, these multi piece handles are where symmetry and fit up, is of the utmost importance. To improve fit and finish and reduce gaps, work both sides at once. Work both front sections together when squaring them, and make sure they ARE square. This allows the copper divider to mate perfectly to the piece of antler, as well as line up perfectly on both sides on the tang. if you get those pieces dead nuts square, and the back sections also totally square, this gives an almost seamless fit with no epoxy lines or alignment errors. If each piece in and of itself is dead flat and square, when they are stacked, the whole assembly will be virtually seamless. My second question would be in the grind. Without dimensions its hard to tell but the stock appears to be in the 3/16 range. If the visible scandi-esque grind is the main primary bevel, at that thickness, the knife will struggle with most all cutting tasks. I think this style of knife would benefit from a grind that was 1/2 way up the blade or more. What happens with a low height grind is that the angle gets too steep and it becomes the equivalent of trying to cut sushi with a splitting maul, simply far too much thickness behind the edge, regardless of how sharp the actual edge is. I would prefer a bevel angle at that thickness of between 3 and 5 degrees per side, so around 10 degrees inclusive. From the picture and estimated thickness, the bevel angle as is, comes in somewhere around 14 to 20 degrees per side, so 28-40 degrees total.

    this is not meant to be discouraging or harsh, simply to point out a few things worth thinking about. When i posted my very first two knives on another forum, i got a lot of the old smoke up the *** comments. Then, after a day or so, A well respected senior member came along and told me "its a good start, but this looks like what happens when every cool teenage knife idea you have had, is left alone in a shop unsupervised and breeds". He pointed out many obvious issues that others missed or chose not to mention. At first I was a bit thrashed, but it caused me to look closer at what i was doing and be more critical of my own work. He politely called out my fit and finish, my cutting geometry, and my overall designs, that in hindsight made very little sense. It forced me to consider things i hadn't before and has helped me dramatically.
     
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  7. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    Grayzer, I totally respect your comments and tips, I thank you very much. What you said make total sense and this is why we are on this forum...to better our self with those that have mastered the art. Every Knife I make is a learning curve and a new challenge that I welcome with open arms. As a knife maker the only time you have to let go of a knife is at the dead line. And even if the client is in love with it you wish you had more time to work on it. Since this knife I have made 2 more that had been requested, the antlers where not divided in two this time. and the bolsters where solid copper, not sandwiched 01 steel with copper inlet. Turned out better, but still had its challenges. I was planning on making a flat grind on the blade for the 3rd one but the client is the same that both the first one and wanted it just like that one.
    But once the orders our out I plan to make another using your tips. and this one ill take more than 2 weeks to make. :D
    Cheers
     
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