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New Shop, New Forge, New Knives.

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by Marc Liss, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. Marc Liss

    Marc Liss New Member

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    Well I've officially moved out of Winnipeg to a property just outside of Roseau River, MB. Now that I've got my own space I am finally able to do some forging. Its tough, but fortunately my fairly practiced grinding skills have been able to redeem most of the blades I have roughed out on the anvil. I've been using files, as well as an old circular saw blade for most of my work. Have a look and tell me what you think so far:

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    krash-bang and SDMay like this.
  2. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    looks good. The circular saw blades what size and thickness? I have been doing a little research and the materials they use varies widely depending on thickness and application, best for small saw blades so far are carbide toothed cold cut saws for ferrous and non ferrous materials which are anything from 1080, 1084, 80Crv2 and 75Crv1.
     
  3. Marc Liss

    Marc Liss New Member

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    This one was about 24 inches across. Very big. Probably about 5/32" thick. I have another thats even bigger. I've heard a good rule of thumb is the older and bigger the better. I've heard the carbide tipped ones are crap but I could be wrong.
     
  4. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Many knife forums say carbide tip is mild steel which is a typical response too not knowing. household circular saw are very low carbon (0.03%) with several alloys to make up the difference and are junk for the most part if you don't have the composition to determine heat treating. Be easy enough to tell since the alloys will greatly slow rusting compared to a 1080 type steel.

    The best I have found out so far is that 1/8" (3mm) and thicker and 14" and larger is a good transition point. Unfortunately North American suppliers are very tight lipped about composition while other countries are more open do too their regulations.

    Even if there was a list of composition there is a good chance it would change as nickel and other alloy prices change. It is also safe to assume our saw blades sold in Canada have steel supplied by only a couple of European mills since that is what they specialize in and their steel compositions are typical. On the other hand some Chinese low end saw blades are just that and composition is similar to a car door steel. very low carbon high alloy work hardening steels.
     
  5. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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    Very nice job on the blades! I am making some kitchen knives for Christmas and have been killing myself trying to find some blackwood or other dark wood for the contrast in the handle but the brass and spacers in between looks very attractive. I think I am going to change my plans.
     
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Great work Marc!
     
  7. bobbybirds

    bobbybirds Best New Maker

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    Pretty cool man!
     
  8. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    That is some nice work I really like that last one .
     
  9. FORGE

    FORGE Maker of the Year Best Knife

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    Looking good ...... !!!
     
  10. krash-bang

    krash-bang Active Member

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    Very nice.
     
  11. Foster J

    Foster J Active Member

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    Nice work. The first is my favorite.
     

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