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New 2 X 72" Grinder Build

Discussion in 'Grinders' started by dancom, Jun 4, 2017.

  1. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    I'm a dunce about electrical stuff. When you talk about the remote control, you mean the little control panel on the vfd right? You're going to extend the wires so they are more up front and accessible?

    Thanks Dan. This is a fantastic deed that you've done for all of us. I know I really appreciate it and I'm sure the others do too. I am moving this weekend so i will not be getting back to setting up my shop for a few weeks but, I may lookup a machine shop right away with a waterjet and see what I can arrange. The Sayber could be my next grinder!!! (is it strange that I'm more excited about getting a new grinder than i am getting a new house?)
     
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  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Hi Todd,

    The VFD has it's little display/keypad on the unit. Some VFDs offer an optional extension cable that can be used to relocate the display/keypad to a more convenient spot. However, I will leave the display/keypad on the VFD and build up a box with some buttons, a tachometer and some LEDs. This will be mounted up top while the VFD itself will reside below the grinder. A handful of small control wires will send the signals to and from the drive to the remote.

    Not strange. You are a guy and machines are in your blood. LOL

    Dan
     
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  3. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Following up with @ToddR

    This is the remote control for the VFD. It sits out front or wherever you like and it's hard wired with a multi-conductor cable back to the VFD enclosure.

    I started with a Hammond cast diecast aluminum enclosure 26827PSLA. This is what I based the drill template and label on. The label and template are made in Adobe Illustrator as I need a way to control the dimensions when printed. Nothing worse then making something 2.3 cm and it comes out 2.4 cm on the printer!
    [​IMG]

    A paper print of the drill template is taped to the front panel. Punch and pilot the holes. That is the snap punch in the photo. Love them!
    [​IMG]

    And some drilling happens. The sizes are on the template. The larger holes (22 mm) I used a 7/8" step on the uni-bit.
    [​IMG]

    Holes drilled.
    [​IMG]

    Masked off for cutting the tach window. I used a jigsaw with a metal cutting blade and cut closely between the holes. The four corner holes need to be big enough to sink a blade. Then I finished the cut out with a file.
    [​IMG]

    The whole outside of the enclosure was painted gloss black (among other items.)
    [​IMG]

    The next day, I laser printed a label on Avery Duralabel polyester stock and cut it out with scissors.
    [​IMG]

    Polyester label stock is not like cheap "indoor use" labels.
    [​IMG]

    The holes lined up pretty good. I wish there was some kind of alignment marks. Improvement for sure. I took three stabs at getting it on straight.
    [​IMG]

    Once the label is on I pressed any bubbles and tried to work any small creases out. Then took the x-acto and trimmed out the openings. Do this from the front as it prevent the label from tearing out.
    [​IMG]

    I installed all the components I had and checked the front panel for alignment.
    [​IMG]

    I still need to get a toggle switch for FWD/REV, but I think this will be an okay remote.
    Some wiring, mounting bolts and a cord grip will finish this off.

    Thanks for looking!

    Dan
     
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  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Got some more work done and last night I took some photos.
    The work rest is finished and flat platen. I used 5/8" round clamped with adjustable handles to allow for vertical and horizontal adjustment.
    The table is 9" x 5" aluminum with stainless flat heads holding it down so there is no worries with water.

    [​IMG]

    Putting the platen on. It's adjustable in and out by 3/4" and side-to-side by 1/4".

    [​IMG]

    Got a belt on it played with the work rest.
    [​IMG]

    Work rest in on and unit in horizontal mode
    [​IMG]

    D plate with tool-less adjustment.
    [​IMG]

    Now on to finishing the wiring and getting this thing motor running!

    Thanks for looking.

    Dan
     
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  5. Grouch

    Grouch Active Member

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    Beautiful design and build Dan. You've put an amazing amount of time and effort into this.
    Thanks for sharing it with everyone.
    Frank
     
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  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Running! Need some work on the remote control and stand, but she's running smooth in H and V.

     
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  7. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Dan, that is one sweet grinder. I tell ya, i'm going to be in the market for a new grinder soon. I don't know how i can't try to build one of these. Now the sharpie thing, magnets in the cap right? : )
     
  8. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Thanks Todd. The magnet trick probably wouldn't work so well with an aluminum tool arm. ;)

    I'll be updating this thread soon on the build. Getting behind with the amount of yard work that has to be done.

    Dan
     
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  9. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    It's been a pretty long time in coming, but the first Open Source Grinder (my DC1) is up and running. Got the 12" wheel on and mounting the 150 pound beast on an old Craftsman Work Mate. Smooth as butter even at 5100 RPM.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]





    The plans and bill of materials are free on the Sayber OSG web site. Working on the assembly manual.
    http://sayberOSG.com/downloads/DC1/Sayber_OSG_DC1_Assembly_Instructions_Draft.pdf
    It's in draft and will definitely be changing. Maybe someone could have a read through and point out some obvious things that are wrong or missing. That would be awesome and you'll receive honorable mention.

    Thanks to everyone who give their input and inspiration.

    Got to get back to making knives one of these days!

    Dan
     
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  10. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    I review documents (reports) for a living and can help out there. be more interesting read than a inspection report
     
  11. cuatroXcuatro

    cuatroXcuatro Active Member

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    What else can one say but Unreal!
    Just a comment, do you not mind having the 4 countersunk screws in the workrest instead of a totally smooth surface?
     
  12. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Thanks Rob.

    No, never had problem with the countersunk flat heads. Seems to be a standard way to do this kind of connection. My Bosch router table has countersunk screws as well as my band saw table. Of course if they to stick up above the table that would be a whole other issue. I guess as long as the piece can sit flat. I can envision a few different tables that can go on there. Large wheel horizontal with an arc cut in it, a flat table with adjustable mitre guides, a hollow grinding jig table or pipe notcher. Being able to interchange different tables that have the same bolt pattern is convenient.

    I am loving this grinder. Worked for about an hour last night on two honesuki wa. It's super smooth and the belt is rock solid and any speed. Lots of mass, good wheels in alignment make all the difference.

    Dan
     
  13. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Now you're just rubbing it in Dan.. : ) My only issue now is finding a shop that will cut the pieces. I'm loving it too and you can tell by the videos of it, it's unbelievably stable... i can almost "feel" how much easier it will be to use. I don't want to be a tool blamer again but, let's be real, it just is easier to work with better tools sometimes. I know it won't replace skill but it can certainly help amplify the skills you have. (i think... - it sounded good in my head)
     
  14. gagan2001

    gagan2001 New Member

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    Anyone have any tips for keeping the wheels inline with each other??
     
  15. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    What design are you working on?

    For this particular design, there isn't a lot of alignment to do as everything is cut from the same thickness of steel. The wheels are set about 0.32" from the right frame. I used 1/2" jam nuts on the platen idlers which are 0.32" thick. Three 0.0625" round shims (washers) on the tracking wheel along with the 0.125" hinge spacer. The drive wheel is set off the frame by the thickness of one jam nut. I used a piece of wood and a sharpie to mark the left side of the platen wheels and transferred that to the drive wheel.

    On other tubular designs where the motor is not bolted directly to the frame you need to first get the motor shaft 90° to the frame. I used a framing square and set the motor square and tightened the foot mount. Then I moved the drive wheel on the motor shaft so that it was 3/8" off the frame. I used a straight edge (large ruler) for this. Then I shimmed the tracking wheel with washers and tweaked it so that the wheel face was parallel with the motor wheel. Finally, I shimmed the platen idler wheels away from the D plate so they matched the tracking wheel. (set the tracking wheel to straight up and down, not tilting positive or negative.) Check the wheel faces with the straight edge. You can also use a caliper and some math to work out the wheel positions by referencing the frame.

    Once the belt is on and the unit is running you can determine if something else needs to be done. If the belt tension is good (30 to 40 lbs) and the belt wobbles side-to-side, likely the tracking wheel is slightly askew from the belt path. This wheel needs to be running as parallel to the belt path as possible. Again, depending on the design, you may need to add a shim or shape a shim or spacer to correct the issue. If the top and bottom platen idlers are not lining up, then likely the frame is not true. You can add or remove a shim or two to move the wheels left or right until the belt is lined up with the wheels and platen.

    Dan
     
  16. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Hi Dan. I'm not a draftsperson at all. I just wanted to make sure that I had the file that I think I had. I downloaded and installed DraftSight so i could take a look at the dxf files. I grabbed Sayber OSG DC1_11-1_long_platen.dxf . Just so I'm sure, this is the layout for the Sayber that will accomodate a longer motor and have a longer platen.
    Is there anything else I should know when speaking to a fab shop? Any tips or advice on what to ask about etc? Is it stipulated on the drawings (sorry for the dumb questions) that it's aluminum etc.? I will look for the specific motor you used. I assume a Kbac vfd is ok.

    I think you've convinced me. Rather than spend a wheelbarrow full of cash on a kmg or a bee, i'll spend a small bag full buying the pieces and having them made. Your youtube demo was pretty convincing. If i can find a shop that will cut this out for me at a decent price, I'll give it a go.

    Thanks Dan. It will take some time, i haven't even started setting up shop yet in my new house but by winter I will be looking forward to working on this.
     
  17. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Hi Todd,

    The file contains the cut information and specifies the material (A36 3/8" thick etc.) You kind of want to know which motor you are going to use. In my case, the Ironhorse I am using is only 9.5" long, so the 10" motor file was fine. Most motors of this type are around 10.5" long so the 11" file works better. The long platen is 12" long while the regular one is 9.5" long.

    Dan
     
  18. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I had someone post in the OSG forum that they were quoted CA$295 for the steel and laser work. They were in Medicine Hat. So that should give you an idea of what to expect. Laser should be cheaper than water jet.

    Dan
     
  19. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Hi Dan. Is there a VFD that you might recommend that will work using a regular 120 receptacle? Is this where the power gets "stepped down" that I read about often. I know the KBAC will work but you seem to have tapped into some more economical choices. I'm not sure what to look for when I look at specs for VFD's. Thanks Dan.
     
  20. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    The trade off is with the extra packaging and time when using an stock industrial AC drive. Yes, open VFDs are cheaper, but they need an enclosure, a fan, air filter, terminal blocks, switches, wire and all that good stuff. Which likely will end up costing about the same. I like doing electrical stuff, custom controls and what-not, so I went with the less expensive VFD and packaged it up myself. Total cost in parts is about the same as buying KBAC-27D.

    The KBAC-24D is good for 1 horsepower and can run on 115 V or 230 V input and outputs 230 V three phase to run a typical small three phase motor. If you want more power, you'll be looking at the KBAC-27D which will run a 2 horsepower motor. Like the 24, the 27 can be powered from 115 V or 230 V input. However, when powered with 115 V the KBAC 27D's horsepower rating is bumped down to 1.5 hp. So if you want 115 V and 1.5 hp the the KBAC-27D is a simple and maintenance free way to go. If you want the full 2 horsepower, you'll need a 230 V receptacle to plug 'er in.

    Maybe this chart is easier to understand.

    [​IMG]


    http://www.kbelectronics.com/manuals/kbac_manual.pdf

    Dan
     

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