1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

My First

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by Wishalot, Mar 22, 2019.

  1. Wishalot

    Wishalot New Member

    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Finally completed a remake of a Kephart style knife as converted from Old Hickory butcher knife. Handle scales are from a broken 30-year old hickory axe handle. Not pretty but rugged, all around utility, sharp.
    This is my first attempt at a knife of my own - have made other sheaths and still waiting to perfect them. But, just had to submit it and let you know how much I appreciate the forums here and the exquisite knives I have seen here.https://i.imgur.com/TlU6sQ7.jpg[​IMG]
     
  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    1,120
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Frank,

    I think you did a great job. Did you reshape the Old Hickory into a Kephart style? It will probably last another 100 years with your new scales.

    I have an Old World (German) friend who is a butcher. He swears by his Old Hickory knives. Nothing glamorous, it's all about serviceability.

    Dan
     
  3. Wishalot

    Wishalot New Member

    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Thanks, Dan. Yes it was reshaped from a 7" model Old Hickory. I used files to cut off and shape the steel. Had a little problem getting the point area where it should be as this remake is a little blunter, I think than the original. I am still rubbing walnut Danish oil into the handle every couple of days and will soon finish it with some carnuba type hard wax. I think I will just let the blade develop a natural patina. The axe handle scales were cut in half with a back saw but smoothed and flattened on a belt sander. Used JB steel epoxy, added a centre pin to the scales and seems quite solid.
    Note: Will forward what the original looked like, the 2nd photo above did not show up directly but the link is at the bottom of the message. (Not too good yet with a lot of stuff these computer gizmos can actually do)
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  4. Wishalot

    Wishalot New Member

    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    8
    This is what the original looked like as it existed in 1902 [​IMG]
     
  5. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    262
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Great knife. Coincidentally, I was in an antique store earlier this week looking for ... all kinds of stuff really... and came across some Old Hickory knives. I think they may have been knock offs. Either that, they were just so old and used that you couldn't really tell anymore. At any rate, one was still razor sharp. for $5 each, I bought both and was initially thinking "restore" but something is making me think I should leave them.

    I should say, I love all the ingenious ideas that people have for knives and I certainly appreciate the craftsmanship people put into them. This forum has some truly world class artisans making knives. But there's something really cool about a no nonsense knife that has no real features but a blade and a really simple wood handle. They cut as good as any other and seem to last just fine. I really like that about old tools. I think it's what they represent.
     
    Wishalot likes this.
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    1,120
    Trophy Points:
    113
  7. Wishalot

    Wishalot New Member

    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Thanks, Todd. Yes, those old antique and/or flea markets possess a lot of hidden little gems. I think that is what got me started in the direction for this knife in that I had bought a well worn and used misshapen knife in a batch of other knives for a total of $8.00. Two of them were the old versions of Mora Classics with laminated steel (Again well worn but salvageable) and an Old Hickory which I kind of filed away on, and restored the best I could. It is doing kitchen duty right now. Really starting to enjoy these old knives and simple steel. I guess I am more apt to use them fearing to ruin the artwork and valuable steel on the more custom and expensive knives.

    Thanks, Dan for that reference to the Kephart knife - I had seen some of it previously and, again something else that led to my attempt at duplicating the shape. Yes, wouldn't it be nice to find an original in one of those antique/flea markets for less than $10.00
     

Share This Page