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Jaxs Knife Project

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by PeterP, Nov 30, 2016.

  1. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    Hi guys, so decided to make a split blade dagger, here is the template rendering.
    sorry not really precise scaling but will give you a idea.
    the handle will be sculpted out of African black wood
    and the guard and pummel will cast aluminum ....the designs of pummel and guard may differ from the rendering....any ideas ...fire them off I'm open.
    take a look and comments are very welcome.
    Cheers
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    I would do all the bevels and details of the blade before cutting out the slot. Might be easier having a solid tip, take finish to 400 grit then heat treat.

    Instead of casting and risking porosity and other junk I would just cut out of a larger plate or round bar and have the pommel turned on a lathe.
     
  3. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    Hey John, yeah that was my plan in order to split the blade...thinking of using the old angle grinder.
    the reason for casting is I just fabricated a Arc foundry and looking forward on getting creative with it.
    and the other reason is I don't have a lathe...wish I did, because I got tons of idea that would require it.
     
  4. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    well if you have a foundry then I see the point of casting :)
     
  5. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    Yeah and its the coolest thing....here is what I based it off...
     
  6. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Local welding supplier carries 1/8" to 3/8" carbon arc electrodes and they have a copper coating to improve conduction.
     
  7. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    wonder if the coating would transfer to let say I'm melting aluminum ?
     
  8. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    It is vaporized and little to none will make it into the melt. They are used for gouging steel for weld preparation and copper transfer would result in cracking if absorption was an issue.

    To make life easier and a little safer search on "carbon Arc welding" and the electrode holder that was used back in the early 1900's. There is even a version that had a hydrogen injector for welding stainless steel, today you could use argon for shielding the material in the furnace
     
  9. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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  10. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Oh yea, one electrode in the roof or top and a couple in the floor of you furnace will work better. This is how industrial size units are set up since the current flows through the material and it melts sooner plus arc initiation is pretty straight forward
     
  11. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    Basically that's what it is...also saw that princess auto sell some various carbon arc electrodes....I saw another guy that built a electric melting pot...but wouldn't trust it really....
     
  12. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    could you just do...one top and one bottom...considering the size of the pot?
     
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  13. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    how would the bottom be sealed off? or do you sit a melting pot on top of it...of the electrode
     
  14. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    I think a refractory clay might work but if it leaks like what happens in a mill you would not want to be around. Might be easiest to have one electrode angled and fixed in place going in from near the top or even in the top. The second one you could feed into a hole in the top that you could use as a feed hole if you want to add in more little bits as it melts.
     
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  15. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

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    think ill stick to the original design of side by side touching tips :D
     
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