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Is The Third One The Charm?

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by james Cuff, Dec 7, 2016.

  1. james Cuff

    james Cuff New Member

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    Well this is my third completed knife, copper bolster, copper pins, cocobolo handle. Overall things went ok, again a lot of mistakes and things to improve. I like the look of the copper but I feel it's going to be way to soft to be effective. I doubt that I will use it in the future. Do any of you have experience with using copper? if so how did it go?

    As always comments, suggestions welcome.

    Cheers.

    James.

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bzcf_jal_jsZd2dwaEp1Q2Jjd0E
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bzcf_jal_jsZQjVyTVNsRGE4aWs
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bzcf_jal_jsZTWliWDg5NTAteWs
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bzcf_jal_jsZNDQzenJKTnNzVXc
     
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  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Hi James,

    You've got the grind angle down to a nice and slicy edge and the materials are great. It looks pretty good for a complex build. A little gap on the left side at the bolster top. There a piece of spacer material sandwiched between the wood and bolster can soften the micro differences. What I like to do is take the bolster pieces off the tang after drilling. Pin them temporarily and then shape them like they were a single piece. Then, drive the temporary pins out and then pin the bolster pieces permanently to the tang. This way they are shaped as one single piece and the lines match up.

    Copper for me is a fair material. It will oxidize and depending on the environment, e.g. salt and chlorine. Luckily regular use with fats that protect the metals and natural oils from the hands it should behave.

    What steel is the blade made of?

    Super #3!

    Dan
     
  3. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Looking very good specially for the third one .
     
  4. james Cuff

    james Cuff New Member

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    Hi Dan,

    thank you for the great suggestions. I am planning on buying some spacer material in the near future. I like the look it gives and anything to improve the fit and finish sounds good to me. I think the gap was from not quite getting the copper 100% flat before assembly, I need to be a bit more diligent on this.

    I know a bad carpenter blames his tools, but I've just bought a used drill press that I am hoping will increase my accuracy when drilling pins. I've noticed that if the holes are even slightly miss aligned or out of plumb then It's a bitch to get the pin through. My remedy has been to sand off a few 1000s from the pin. End result is that the pin fits but leaves a noticeable gap.

    sorry I forgot to mention the steel is O1, heat treated in my garage with some fire bricks and a tiger torch. Then quenched in warm canola. It's a fun process and my garage smells like french fries after, win, win.

    James.
     
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  5. james Cuff

    james Cuff New Member

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    Thanks Kevin, I have to admit that I've got a bit of a bug for this. I think I've watched every youtube video on stock removal 3 times. Some standouts have been the videos by Walter Sorrells and Aaron Gough, not to mention all the great info on this forum and others. It's great to see a community that is about sharing knowledge and helping everyone improve.

    I think I'm sold on a 2x72 and trying to decide between the Oregonbladesmith model or the KMG from knifemaker.ca. I think there is a couple of hundred dollar difference, but I'm leaning towards the KMG since it will probably be the last grinder I ever buy.

    James.
     
  6. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Will if it's going to be the last one you buy get the best one right at the start.KMG But if money is not a problem TW90 .
    When you drill you pins always put your wood outside to you knife handle so you drill through the face first. Drill a hole put a pin in that hole then drill your next hole .This will keep things lined up for you. Once you have that done put you other side on and do the same . Old drill bits make great pins .One thing I like is to have my handle material even before I drill my pins . But when I do bolster like you did I do one side at a time . Put the bolster and then glue one side on first .Then when glue is dry drill your holes with a new drill bit turning very fast. After that do the other side on and drill back through when the glue is dry so you know everything will line up glue you pins in last.A little longer this way but things will be in line.
    Hope you understand I'm not good on explaining thing in writing.:(


    There is a lot of helpful people here and for videos there some good one I just don't remember them. I just got my own way of grinding blades and i think most people got there own ways of doing thing.
     
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  7. james Cuff

    james Cuff New Member

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    Ok the TW90 is bad ass that's for sure, but at $3500 US that's a lot of cash. My wife is normally ok with me buying a few tools (think $200 drill press) but she may raise more than an eyebrow about a $4000+ CND grinder. Does it have a pillow attachment? Because I think I would be sleeping in the garage.

    The way you explained adding bolsters makes sense to me, next time I will have a better understanding about what to do. I just looked at your facebook page you make some very cool knives. Where do you sell them or are they all custom orders?

    James.
     
  8. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Lol that was funny
    you can find me on Instagram to under KCKnices.
    I think it do come with that attachment haha. I'm lucky my wife don't ask what's in my shop.
    I sell my knives just about anywhere in Canada. So far they have sold by word of mouth and Facebook. Some are custom orders but very few I don't like custom orders. I like making my own knives then sell them but I do let the customer pick the handles most of the time as I'm alway behind on orders. I do more kitchen knives these days than others but still like to mix things up.
    If you have any questions don't be shy in asking .
    When I pin bolsters I use 1/8 pins drill a 1/8 hole then use a # 30 drill bit and drill down about half way from the outside in each piece of your bolster . Clean you pin then you pin your bolster on make sure it's up tight to your knife few small taps on your pins first will set thing up . Then give your pins a few good hits on each side . You will hide you pins better that way . Some flare the hole but I prefer useing a # 30 drill bit . Plus I like to 45 the backs of my bolsters two ways it hides the join and don't look so square.
     
  9. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    This is just to show you how I put my bolsters and the angles I use and these days I only use g10 for bolsters haven't used metal for a bolster in a long time.
     
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  10. james Cuff

    james Cuff New Member

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    Kevin, I do like the look of the 45 degree bolster line. I may have to attempt this on one of my next couple of knives. Do you attach the bolster to the blade and then add the rest of the handle with the bolster attached to the blade? or do you build a scale that consists of both the bolster and the rest of the handle glued together?

    James.
     
  11. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Two ways
    I glue the bolsters on the knife first then fit my wood after the glue is dry. I clamp a file guide across my handle to the angle I cut my bolsters so that way I know both sides are even.

    When I use a liner like the bottom picture I do it different . I make the both liners drill all the pin holes first then glue the bolsters on you can leave the front long and just worry about the back been even .
    I pin my two liners together with a piece of wax paper between them don't want to glue them together. Then I do the same with the file guide . Clamp it across the liners. Once the glue is dry you can shape the front of your bolsters while the two liners are pined together. Then I add wood to each piece once thats dry you will have your holes in your liners so just finish drill through your wood. Be careful here as your drilling out through your wood . Clamp it to a scrap piece of plywood before you drill this will keep it from splitting out sharp bit turning fast helps a lot to .
    Just make sure there's no glue in your angle because if it drys it will never fit together .
    I just wipe it out with a thin rag and a tittle contact cement remover that stuff cut through any glue do not use to must you don't want it to run under your bolster and scrap your glue.
    Others my do it different than I do .
    One other little thing I do is run tape back pass were my handle goes then pin on you handle take a razor balde and cut around the front of you handle . Then just remove the tape that under you handle keeping the rest on your blade. When you glue your handle on the glue will squeeze out onto the tape .Take a Q tip with a little contact cement remover on one end and give it a quick wipe then dry it with the other end . This will keep the front clean from glue and makes life a lot easier trying to remove dried glue from the front and keeps from getting scratches there to.
     
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  12. james Cuff

    james Cuff New Member

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    Ok that last tip is great. dealing with squeeze out onto the blade from the handle is always a problem for me. putting tape and then trimming it will help solve that problem. I've never seen that on any videos but it sounds like it's a very good idea.

    Thank you very much for all the advice. I will have to read through your description a few times to let it sink in before I give it a try. I have another blank ready to go into heat treat tonight so I will be working on a handle in the next couple of days (it's a Christmas gift so I'm on a timeline). It will be a composite of some description with an angled bolster so your tips will come in very handy.

    Thank you!
     
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  13. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Good luck with it and I'm happy if I can help a little. There's a lot of little things you don't see on videos that can help a lot .
    when I hand sand my blades they all get masking tape on them before I flip them over to hand sand the other side.
     
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  14. bob682

    bob682 New Member

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    it is a very nice knife, just from the picture i would say you could use a bit of extra attention to sharpening the tip nice and sharp, i would recommend doing that by hand as well since a machine tends to be unforgiving when doing this, other then that its a wicked knife i like the color of the copper, you could force a thin patina on your pins and bolster if you want to add a bit of extra protection and dont mind that aged look.
     

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