1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

How to - knife grind

Discussion in 'Working the Steel' started by knifeaholic92, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. knifeaholic92

    knifeaholic92 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Hi guys ! I was wondering if you had any advice on how to make a nice bevel every single time? I know a few ppl use a jig, but what do you do? If you use a jig, what are the dimensions of it ? And on what type of grinder do you use it?

    Thanks a lot

    Max
     
  2. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I personally wouldn't use a jig for the purpose that you are putting all your faith in the tool and no real personal control or feel. I would suggest a flat platen with a tool table nice and easy to work with and will give you a personal experience with angle, passes and control. Once you get a feel for it you'll get it right every time.
     
  3. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    152
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I think Steve pretty much nailed it. I'll just add that it is a good idea to scribe a line on center of your blade as a reference. You could also scribe a line on both sides so you know how high to go with the bevel.
     
  4. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

    Likes Received:
    145
    Trophy Points:
    43
    It you are looking for consistency and something that will teach you to freehand grind, rather than just relying on jigs, I can't recomend Fred Rowes bubble jig enough. It is an excellent tool that can quickly improve your free hand grinding skills.
     
  5. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

    Likes Received:
    266
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I agree with what everyone is saying, with one exception. If you are grinding small blades (slip joints and such) holding the blade can be problematic. So yeah, I use a jig. It's simple and works well. You can see it in this thread.
     
  6. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    152
    Trophy Points:
    63
    And I thought I read every thread on this site. Lol. I must have missed that one. Glad you posted the link Myth.
     
  7. knifeaholic92

    knifeaholic92 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Thanks to all of you! If you got any tutoriĆ  videos on freehand grinding feel free to link them below :)
     
  8. Nor'easter

    Nor'easter New Member

    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Knifeaholic, welcome.
    Everyone has their own litle set of skills and techniques when it comes to shaping and beveling a blade. I grind mostly free hand. One thing that helps me get a semi even grind is once I find the right angle I lock both hands on the blade, one on handle or tick tang, and the other on the tip and I sway or shift my whole body back and forth across the belt sander keeping my shoulders even. This works pretty good. As well practice practice practice, especially on your weak handed side.
     
  9. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

    Likes Received:
    145
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I free hand grind with the bubble jig. I decided it was best for me because then I could learn and improve my free hand skill. That said there is absolutely no shame in using jigs or anything else that works. I think in all honesty there are a lot more makers using jigs than will admit online. Mike Snody has insanely clean and crisp grinds, and uses jigs all the time. John grimsmo makes beautiful folders, and in reality doesn't even grind at all really, just CNC mill to shape and sharpen. If you ask 100 makers how they grind you will get 102 different answers. It's mostly a case if practice and getting a feel for what works for you.

    When you find out what side is your strong side and what grind side is weaker, I suggest always doing the weak side first. This is because it's easier to make adjustments on your strong side to match the weak side, than to try to match the weak to the strong.
     
  10. Nor'easter

    Nor'easter New Member

    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Good advice
     
    snailgixxer likes this.
  11. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    28
    A great tip I learned when improving my freehand grinding was when you are about to put the blade to the belt if you'll notice the blades shadow on the belt itself. Keep that shadow straight and the grinder will do the rest. Not sure if I shared that tip before its a great technique and EASILY overlooked!
     
    Nor'easter likes this.
  12. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    1,126
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Please bear with me, I am still into primitive file methods until my grinder is finished.
    Does anyone use a plunge guide? I saw somewhere on the net how to make one out of tool steel and then harden it. This simply clamps on to the blade and ensures your plunge lines are in line on both sides of the blade.

    The next question is: Grind with cutting edge up or cutting edge down? Intuitively I would think cutting edge down, but I've seen a few tutorials showing the other way. Any advantages/disadvantages to either way?
     
  13. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I would assume the plunge guide might be a great idea although I've never thought of it or tried it I'm sure it would work well. As far as the grinding I would grind edge up you will have much better control and be able to see your work. There is really no danger in edge up grinding as the blade is still thick enough to not catch an edge. I have also seen edge down grinding and would have to guess that most using this method might also be using a jig. Personal preference for the individual really but I find much more control with edge up because there is a much smaller chance of the blade running away from you with the force of the belt. Hope this helps I'm sure others have some tips as well.
     
  14. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

    Likes Received:
    145
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I use a plunge guide and find it works great. It's not a fancy carbide file guide like Bruce bump makes but it's the one that came with my bubble jig. Works excellent for keeping plunges straight and even since I can run it right up against the side of the platen. Additionally I grind edge up as do most guys. I find it's far easier to know where you are at with edge thickness, which, if your angle is consistent, gives a relative indication of bevel height evenness without looking at the actually bevel. It's also a lot easier to see that your plunges are cutting in evenly on both sides than if you ground edge down. Edge down has one other drawback in that grit that travels around the belt hits the flat above your bevel on the way down. This can cause the transition to be less crisp, or even give you some scratches that can be harder to work out later. I have not tested this myself but several makers that I have a lot of respect for have mentioned it.
     
  15. poppa bear

    poppa bear Member

    Likes Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Hi guys new here,

    I have been reading this extremely close as I only have a bench grinder to use at present so I was wonder if there are any suggestions or tips for possible jigs or free hand idea as to what to start with and finish with?

    Pb
     
  16. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Good easy tip is to have some light on your grinder so it casts a shadow on the wheel as you grind your blade across it. Watch the shadow not the blade as much, if the shadow is straight you are grinding straight as well. Good tip even for experienced makers. Hope this helps.
     
  17. poppa bear

    poppa bear Member

    Likes Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Would that be for a hollow or an ax grinds?
     
  18. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Either or.. Depending on your wheel size (ie.6") it will end up being more of a flat grind than a hollow grind as you can only work with the curve of the wheel. If you use an 8"-10" wheel then you will have a noticeable hollow grind.
     
  19. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Either or.. Depending on your wheel size (ie.6") it will end up being more of a flat grind than a hollow grind as you can only work with the curve of the wheel. If you use an 8"-10" wheel then you will have a noticeable hollow grind.
     
    dancom likes this.
  20. poppa bear

    poppa bear Member

    Likes Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    18
    :beer::)Thanks Steve
     

Share This Page