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Hi there!

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Nev Dull, May 19, 2010.

  1. Nev Dull

    Nev Dull CKM Staff

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    Am I the first one to post here? Anyway just thought I'd stop by and say hi. I don't know anything about making knives but I'm interested to learn. What do you need to start? Is it expensive?


    Regards

    2Kane
     
  2. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Welcome to Sask Knifemakers, 2Kane.

    Yes, you are the first to post. That ought to be worth something, so we've boosted your Rep.

    If you want to learn about making knives, just keep asking questions. We'll try to answer as best we can. To answer your first questions, it's like many hobbies or sports. You can do it on the cheap (and still make excellent knives) or you can spend huge amounts of money (and still make excellent knives). I think most makers begin with a few basic tools, then add more as their skill grows and their wallets (or spousesĀ  :D) allow.

    So what tools do you need to get started? A hacksaw, a good set of files, a small drill press (or even one of those drill press attachments for a portable drill) and lots of sandpaper. You'll also need some steel for the blade and some handle material. There are lots of choices for both.
     
  3. dwilkes

    dwilkes New Member

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    As stated above you can make knives with a very modest selection of tools or you can sell the farm and buy tools til you run out of room. But all the cool tools in the world wont help if you don't know what you want to make or how to get there. Hacksaw , files, a drill of some kind , and sandpaper are your best starters. Get some simple carbon steel for the blade and some handle material ( some type of pins needed as well for handle ) and you are on your way. I would strongly suggest a simple small fixed blade pattern for your first try. Take time to study whatever resources you can for styles of knives, handle shapes and overall looks you like. Don't get too complicated and your success rate should be good.
     

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