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Hello from Parick Ryan

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by NinjaMaster, Oct 12, 2012.

  1. NinjaMaster

    NinjaMaster New Member

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    Good day folks, I am new to blacksmithing and knife making, my teen sons age 14 & 15 and I are getting into the hobby. So far we have our anvil, a few 4.5 inch angle grinders, Pole Vice, 8" Drill press and slowly accumulating the tools needed to do this and have fun. Buying a nice 2 burner propane forge.

    Now just need a good belt grinder and A good bench vice and help in learning lol.

    I am a retired Canadian Military Capt and veteran 28 years. Still working as a civilian in DND , I live in Debert Nova Scotia .
     
  2. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Welcome aboard, Cap'n. We've got more than a few experienced forgers here who should be able to help you out. I'm just preparing to start down that path myself.
     
  3. NinjaMaster

    NinjaMaster New Member

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    Awesome, I think I am really going to enjoy this as a hobby and my oldest son Connor will most likely get into it full time after High-school and go to farrier School in Truro Nova Scotia . Now I must get me a nice 2 x 72 Belt Grinder, I sent a message to a guy whom on the forms here who stated he might be building a few custom ones and looking for interest if anyone wants one. So I sent him an PM and said Hell ya.

    Cheers.
     
  4. Celberon

    Celberon New Member

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    Hi Patrick.
    You're not alone. I'm just getting started myself only with almost no kit ;-)
    Thinking about producing a full tang file conversion probably with oak or ash scales.
    What are you thoughts for a first time blade?
     
  5. NinjaMaster

    NinjaMaster New Member

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    Well I am thinking of do not skimp on a good Drill Press, Forge and a half decent 1 x 30 or 1x 24 or 2x30 or 2x72 or even a 4x 34 Belt sander/grinder. As it will be needed for sock removal or Do it by hand. Forge if you got a good Forge a Nice Anvel then DO it all by hand , get good metals to do it with. MESS UP Who cares, your pounding and having fun and with my boys its MENS TIME. Woot. So could be fun.

     
  6. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Much of it depends on where your interests lie, both in what you're making and what you want to learn. Starting off with stock removal requires fewer tools (I started with a drill press, a hack saw, and a good set of files). Forging requires more tools (and space) and comes with a steeper learning curve. However, if forming knives from hot metal is what motivates you, then that's the direction you need to go. I think it's good to get a taste of both. I've been making my little folders for a couple of years now, enjoying the learning process. I also have a forge that is inching towards completion. When it's done, I'll take a whack (pun intended) at forging as well.
     
  7. Celberon

    Celberon New Member

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    I have the same starting kit as you had.
    Would love to learn how to use a forge and maybe one day produce a damascus blade.
    After reading some of the warnings posted here on CK and AnvilFire I thinking might content myself with stock removal for the time being.
    Thanks for the tips.
     
  8. NinjaMaster

    NinjaMaster New Member

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    Well, I am getting a Propane Forge, either from UsA or there is a maker out west, Canada, little more cost and looks smaller, so not sure. By having a forge made from someone in the business for a few years , makes it a bit more safe lol, now I need find good set of Safty Full cover glasses for the heat and all and to protect from metal dust when grinding etc. get that sousaphone in the eyes and NoT Good. Have respirators so good there, I figure do Rail Spikes for a bit, get used to pounding and drawing them out, Going to take training from www.firehouseironworks.com a nice shop in Cape Breton and he holds classes so way cool thus cut the learning curve down and make sure were doing things right lol. Next year possible or following might look at taking my son and I to Montana for a weeks long training with Ed Caffrey whom is well known blade smith. Should help. Wish there were more videos YouTube etc of doing kits or forgeing a blade etc. Might hVe to invest in a few DVDs for now to get me though to next year. Ay suggestions on videos /DVDs. PS looking for a good source of handle pins, or counter sunk screw system for handles etc, Canada preferred unless UsA is no probs too get. Cheers. And my first blade type forged will be rail spike, but will pound out end and make a handle, next will be kit ready Damascus blades as I have a local source in Nova Scotia for rare, exotic stabilized woods for handles and all, woot. Will get pictures up of my garage once my boys and I get it ready as now it's a Junk pile lmao.
     
  9. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    An important consideration in your gas forge is whether to go vertical or horizontal. Vertical forges tend to give more even heat but can be difficult for something bigger like a hawk or hatchet.

    I'm glad you mentioned safety. Taking care of safety is the key to a long and healthy life as a knifemaker. If you haven't come across it, we do have a Safety Thread started with some basic tips.
     
  10. BigUglyMan

    BigUglyMan Active Member

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    You'll find that you end up with more than one forge. I started with a vertical but want to make a horizontal as well. some times you want to leave something in the forge and step away. Not so easy with the vertical.

    I'm not familiar with Debert's location but if you fancy a road trip you should head downtown Cape Breton to Whycocomagh and meet Grant Haverstock at Firehouse Ironworks. He's not a knifemaker but he's a helluva blacksmith and he does clinics on everything from basic to advanced blacksmithing. Good way to learn how to tend a coal fire and how to properly work metal on the anvil. I intend to be invading the shop pretty heavily in December. I can smith all day for the price of a burger and a beer so Grant will never be rid of me!

    Plus with you having two sons you would do well to get them trained up as strikers. You could just hold the stock in the tongs and point to where you want it hit. You know what they say about old age and treachery!

    Welcome to the sickness buddy. Don't say we didn't warn you!
     
  11. NinjaMaster

    NinjaMaster New Member

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    Hey Thanks Big, The name here is Patrick Ryan. Debert, is 23 KM past Truro heading to Moncton. Yes indeed I plan on a visit with my boys and GRANT, doing a weekend thing I hope, I want to learn properly. Here is a link to one Forge I am thinking of getting http://www.diamondbackironworks.com/2_burner_blacksmith.html

    The other looks nice, but can not be used for making other items as its too small but is a nice BLADE / KNIFE maker. https://sites.google.com/a/thermalartdesign.com/www/bladesmith-2-forge

    Have a boo and let me know what ANYONE Thinks. Its a 2 Hr Drive to IRONWORKS, but we will be some time.

     
  12. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Just my 2 (now outdated) pennies worth:

    Both the forges you reference look really nice. If you're looking for a drop in solution and don't mind parting with the cash, either will do you. However, a forge doesn't have to cost you that much. While I'm not one of those who thinks you should build every tool from scratch to be a "real" knifemaker, I do believe in saving a buck or two where I can. As important a tool as it is, building a forge isn't that difficult or expensive and the bonus is that you can make it to fit your specific needs. And since you're looking at doing this as a family affair, you could build two or three for the price of one of those in your links.

    The horizontal forge I'm working on will cost me maybe $250CDN, and $200 of that is the ITC100 (expensive stuff), the Kaowool, and the gas hookup (hose, regulator, valve). It won't be as pretty as those ones you're looking at but it will put out more than enough heat. If I can ever get back in the shop, I hope to have it done next month. (I will have pictures.)
     
  13. NinjaMaster

    NinjaMaster New Member

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    Cool, I am always about safety and not sure of my abilityies around Propane LOL and best get it NICE safe then OM Freaking Gosh, What the hell was that explosion and where are my Kids. LMAO
     
  14. BigUglyMan

    BigUglyMan Active Member

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    Had I read the whole thread I wouldn't have has to shill so hard for Grant!

    I built my own forge from a 20lb propane tank and a burner made by board member Forge. There's a thread on it on the board. I salvaged almost everything needed to make it. I agree that this hobby is about making things and saving a buck or two. If you build your own forge you'll have exactly what you want and have no one but yourself to blame for the things you hate!

    Check out www.homemadetools.net and www.instructables.com for step by step tutorials to build your own forge.

    I got your contact info in my inbox. I'll hit you up in the next few days.
     
  15. NinjaMaster

    NinjaMaster New Member

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    Kk, thanks
     

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