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Grind On : 154cm Kitchen Knife

Discussion in 'Folders' started by dancom, Jan 17, 2016.

  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    It's freezing. I spent the last couple hours in the shop grinding, sans heat. My dunk bucket was froze, but perseverance pays off.

    This the next knife off the press. It's a 185 mm kiritsuke style knife made from 154CM stainless of 1/8" stock. The tang has been fitted with a stainless steel machine screw that will press into the keyhole during final assembly.

    This blade was profiled and heat treated, then ground with 36, 60 and 120 grit ceramic belts. The conditioning was with fine and very find vortex belts.

    [​IMG]

    I use the garage door, being white in colour, and the overhead fluorescent lights to check lines.
    [​IMG]


    This is after some fine conditioning belt action.
    [​IMG]

    When the weather gets warmer, I can get back in the shop and get this done.

    Hope you have some grind on.

    Dan
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2016
  2. Grizz Axxemann

    Grizz Axxemann Active Member

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    So with stock that thin and long you heat treat before you put a bevel on? Is that to give it enough meat to keep it from warping?
     
  3. snailgixxer

    snailgixxer Golf season is here:)!!!!

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    Yep that definitely helps grizz. I haven't heat treated 154Cm but you might be able to plate quench it. And that would be good to keep it from warping as well. What's the heat treating on this Dan?
     
  4. Grizz Axxemann

    Grizz Axxemann Active Member

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    I feel like I learned something :D
     
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  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Oil quenched. I used to plate quench in copper plates and compressed air, but I found oil quenching results in harder steel. These Japanese style knives are typically harder than their European counterparts.
     
  6. bobbybirds

    bobbybirds Best New Maker

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    Can you break down your process a bit Dan?

    Do you basically cut to shape, oil quench and temper and then grind?
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Yes. Cut the stock, grind it back to the line. Drill and notch keyhole. This is 154CM, so I heat to 750°C soak for a few minutes. Ramp to 1060°C, soak for about 15 minutes. Quench in oil and place immediately into tempering oven at 200°C. Two 2 hour cycles in the tempering oven and it's ready to start grinding the bevels. Needless so say it takes a while to get through. The steel is quite hard, around HRC 60, requires good belts and many passes, but no issues with warping.

    Dan
     
  8. bobbybirds

    bobbybirds Best New Maker

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    Thanks for that! If one was using a steel in the same dimensions, but 1095 or 1084, is warping still as much of a worry?
     
  9. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    any steel that has been ground can warp. It has to do with balanced removal of material, unfortunately the thinner the material the higher percentage of material is removed with each pass for a given grit of belt.
    On top of this when viewed in cross section the blade has a higher volume above the center and as a result greater amounts of shrinking when quenched.

    This leads to the top of the blade being shorter than the edge and significant stress increase along the cutting edge. One reason why blades can crack along the edge as it is to narrow too withstand the loads applied, sanding the edge so that the sanding marks run lengthwise helps get rid of little notches in the blade that will act as crack initiation points.

    A steel ground after heat treating may also take on a warp but that would mean significant asymmetrical grinding has occurred.

    If you search "Heat straightening steel" or "Flame straightening steel" you will find tons of info. The basic principle is why blades will warp when quenched.
     
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  10. Roman

    Roman Best Leatherwork Best Build

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    When I read "154cm kitchen knife" I though "It must be a kind of kitchen sword"...
     
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  11. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Hahaha Roman you are right. The title is automatically set to title case. Can't have two capital letters in a row. Doh!

    A 154 centimetre knife would be a bit a nightmare to heat treat. LOL

    Dan
     
  12. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    But handy if you have wildebeest running free in the kitchen
     
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