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Greetings from taylor, bc!

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Lincoln, May 31, 2014.

  1. Lincoln

    Lincoln New Member

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    Hello, All!

    I have lurked here for a couple of weeks, hoping to glean as much as I can before I repeat all the newbie questions. :)

    A few quick notes about myself, in point form for speed.
    -I am totally new to metalworking and knifemaking.
    -I am working on my electrical apprenticeship to pay the bills.
    -I like to make things myself, especially specialty items, and I have built eight guitars.
    -I am not able to invest a lot of money into my knife-making aspirations, and am hoping to get by for a while with my drill presses, belt sanders (1x42, 6x48, and 6x89), and Taig microlathe. No forge in my near future, so I'll have to figure out a way to work around that.
    -My purpose in getting into knife-making is to make hunting, fishing, skinning, and boning knives, probably mostly for myself, but we'll see where this goes. I do not plan to make money at this for a long time, if ever.

    I have searched my local library for books, and all I was able to find were 1) a book on making folders, which is not quite what I am after, and 2) Knifemaking by Bo Bergman, which I hesitate to place too much credibility in because his blades appear to be quite rough, and his methods include using pre-existing blades from Frost. Frost knives do not seem to get the best reviews, although maybe the blades he used were not made by the same company I found reviews for. I have an old-looking Frost knife, and it isn't amazing.

    My plan is to make my first knife out of a circular saw blade from the local lumber mill. I realize that it will likely be inferior steel, but I hope to gain some grinding skills without spending much money.

    Is there a book someone could recommend, or a tutorial online I could read? I get overwhelmed looking at all the steel choices, and I don't even know enough to know what I don't know.

    Anyway, I'm grateful to find a Canadian forum, and looking forward to learning what I can.
     
  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Welcome Lincoln,

    You'll fit right in here. I know there are a few guitar makers and certainly a bunch of players (including me) hiding in the woodwork here. I am in Electrical as well and I prefer to design things myself, heat treat oven, belt grinder etc.

    Old saw blades and files are good to practice on, but a 14" long piece of 1/8" x 1-1/2" 1084 is under $10 at Canadian Knifemaker Supply. The great thing about 1084 you can heat treat with a mini-forge (a few fire bricks & a swirl-tip propane torch) and some cooking oil. This is where the fun is! 1084 makes an awesome blade and is forgiving enough for newbies to heat treat. My $0.02 only.

    Let us know how things are coming along.

    All the best,

    Dan
     
  3. Tony Manifold

    Tony Manifold New Member

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    Welcome.

    Where is Taylor? It is not a town I am familiar with. I am on the island in comox.

    Making a guitar is on my list if things to do. Sitting around strumming a guitar I made would be awesome.

    Dan has the right idea with the steel. Using found materials is an art in itself, with price of quality carbon steel being so cheap, it is better to start on known metal. The only thing I might say is that found metal can be good to practice on.

    Good books include 50 dollar knife shop my Wayne Goddard. Bladesmithing by Murray Carter (a traditional Japanese mastersmith despite being from nova Scotia) and the complete bladesmith by Jim Hsirsoulas(sp?)

    Edit: BTW if you want to know what steel to use go to knifemaker.call and see what he has. If he has it its good for knives. If you have any questions about a specific steel post it here or calk Rob up at knifemaker.camp and ask. You can't go wrong with a 1084/1095 steel.
     
  4. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Welcome to the forums, Lincoln.

    For books, you can't go wrong with Goddard's. They cover the basics on a budget. Step-by-Step Knifemaking by David Boye is also pretty good. The books work best if you get yourself some steel and work along. As the others have suggested, carbon steel is a good first bet. 1084 is probably the most forgiving you can find. O1 is another good starting steel. Both are inexpensive, easy to work, and make excellent blades.

    In addition to the books, you now have us. Ask questions, take pictures or video to show us the problem and you're bound to get some great, practical advice.
     
  5. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    Hot Rod Lincoln from the Peace !!
    Welcome , lots of good info right here on the forum.....if the saw steel you have has carbide tips I'd pass on it for a number of reasons but that's another can of worms......

    Call Rob at knifemaker supply and order some 1084.....your close to Alberta so you could send your blades back to him for heat treat until your set up with your own forge , 2 brick , oven , whatever you decide to go with, he does a nice job and you'll know there done correct......and 1084 is cheap....

    Best thing to do is ask away , most questions asked can more less be answered right here....good luck , have fun , keep it inexpensive for now and proceed at your own pace....

    I usually get up your way to visit family and for work a couple times in the summer months , then once or twice for hunting season if time allows ....

    Rob in Kelowna
     
  6. Lincoln

    Lincoln New Member

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    Thank you all for the warm welcome! I feel at home here already.

    Tony, Taylor is about five hours north of Prince George, and 15 minutes southeast of Fort St John. Have you checked out Wood to Works in Courtenay? Might be a fun place for you to pop in and say hi to Dale.

    Rob, let me know when you're coming through, and if it works to get together. I'd love to see your work and chat for a bit.

    Ok, I think I'm nearly convinced not to bother with these saw blades! I'd still be interested in your reasons, whenever and wherever you have time to explain. I searched google for reasons for or against using carbide-tipped blades for knives, and the best answer I could come up with was something like "It's not meant to hold an edge, it's meant to hold teeth, which are fastened on by brazing." That is probably the abridged and paraphrased version.

    I'll look for those books, especially Goddard's. Thank you all for your help!
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Hi Lincoln,

    That can of worms that Rob was talking about goes something like this:

    If a blade has carbide tips, they are the hard cutting edges. The tips are attached to regular steel, which won't be hard enough to make a useful knife. When manufacturers join two different metals to make a blade it's often called "bi-metal".

    If the blade is an old-school kind without attached tips, the tips of the same steel blade will be sharpened. The whole blade will be high carbon steel and generally good for making a knife.

    It comes up from time-to-time so I made a graphic this morning. Taking a few liberties and generalizing, but this is the idea:
    [​IMG]

    Cheers!

    Dan
     
  8. Lincoln

    Lincoln New Member

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    Ok, thanks, Dan. I get it. New steel it is. :)
     
  9. BigUglyMan

    BigUglyMan Active Member

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    For the price of admission, a small chunk of 1084 from Knifemaker.ca is just about the same as buying a saw blade at the store and it's the right stuff. Just like guys that say they're going to buy a cheap piece of hardwood to whittle their first gunstock when they might as well buy a walnut blank and end up with an end product that they will be happy with. This will work better for you in the end.

    Welcome to the forum.
     
  10. Jim T

    Jim T Active Member

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    Hey Lincoln! Welcome to a great forum! I was in your position a few years ago, just getting started with knifemaking. Took my first lesson from Ed Storch, a knifemaker in Mannville, Alberta and I was hooked!

    If you already have some decent belt sanders and drill presses, you’re already ahead of the curve if you want to get into stock removal (grinding a blade out of a bar of steel). That’s usually the technique I use to make knives. Forging is fascinating and fun, but I don’t have the space or the funds to get into that quite yet.

    Besides the books listed above, I’ve also gotten a lot good information and tips from one called How to Make Knives by Robert W. Loveless. Black and white pictures, but decent step-by-step instructions.

    Lots of great people on this forum, novice and experienced and everything in between. Good luck!

    Jim T
     
  11. Lincoln

    Lincoln New Member

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    Thanks, Mr. Big and Jim. I'll get a hold of knifemaker.ca when I have some extra dollars that I can put toward this venture. Thanks for the book recommendations, too.
     

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