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Great Sandpaper (and A Question - Always With The Questions)

Discussion in 'Working the Steel' started by ToddR, Feb 7, 2017.

  1. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    As a newcomer to knifemaking, I’ve been trying a lot of different techniques and products just to determine what works best for me. I think I found something that I really like and wanted to share it with you guys.

    I’ve been using wet/dry sandpaper for most of my sanding but recently I ran out. This meant I had to use what I had or make a trip to town for more. Being lazy, I used what I had. It happened to be 280grit Gator brand finishing sandpaper ( I think it’s meant for an orbital sander). I wasn’t sure if I should use it dry or not but I was just starting on this blade so I figured I couldn’t ruin it too fast. I loved it. It worked fast and even. I wrapped it around a block and used it like that and I couldn’t believe how quickly it worked. I switched to a finer grit and it was one of the best, and easiest sanding jobs I’ve ever done.

    So, my question is a bit after the fact. Is there a problem with dry sanding over wet? I have used this paper once or twice more since the first time and once I finished with 600grit wet just to make sure buit, I’m not sure I needed it. Admittedly, my eyesight isn’t the greatest but using my shop magnifying glass, I couldn’t see any difference between the job I did dry and the one I finished with wet paper.

    Anyway, I’m loving this Gator sandpaper. It’s the one in the green package. I believe it’s meant for ¼ orbitals.
     
  2. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    WHat happened to the light colored wood thread? i clicked the link in my email and it went to a whole different subject
     
  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    from the vanished thread


    Once I am at the point of that happening I use a fine file to knock the pins down and give the wood a coat of Tru-oil . The oil helps seal the wood and reduce pickup of contaminates, easily washed off at that point.


    Sorry John, I don't quite follow. At the point that you file down the pins, are your wood scales already sanded to the point you want them? I'm finding I can't figure out how to sand the scales and avoid the pins.

    Basically, how do i get to the point where i only need to file the pins, I guess.
     
  4. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    For the most part I use stabilized materials or darker woods but the couple times I worked with straight wood I cut the pins flush to the wood and filed them flat.

    Shaped the handle until 90% complete
    coat with Tru-oil
    file pins flush with flat file
    sand wood and pins at the same time, once I started getting into the wood I refreshed the oil coating. repeat this at every grit change and sometimes sooner.

    This way the pores of the wood are always sealed and will only have surface contamination which is easily removed.
     
  5. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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  6. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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