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First Freehand Grinding

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by Slannesh, Jul 18, 2015.

  1. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    Hey everyone,

    Very new here. But started on some new knives last night. These are smaller and intended to be either neck knives or trout & bird knives, just something small and sharp.

    My first knives I ground with a jig, tried to use the same jig with these and the knives being much smaller and not as deep meant I very quickly couldn't see what I was doing. Only two options that I could see, toss them or learn to Freehand. So really, only one choice :)

    Thankfully I had watched a bunch of youtube vids from various guys and learned a few do's and don'ts so I wasn't going in totally blind. This is the result of my first round at 40 grit:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    I've also got some new Micarta curing right now as well. Will do at least two different types for these ones. Purple and Pink for the longer one with the point on the bottom and black and green for one of the drop points. I'm still undecided as to what to do with the second drop point. More pics will come as I progress. Happy with them thus far!
     
  2. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    Looking good. Good choice on doing the free hand grinding. I'm not against using fixtures but I feel once you get the gang of free hand grinding it is faster and easier than using a fixture because you don't have to waste time setting up the fixture angles. I was going to make a fixture but I wanted to make my first knife instead. Lol. After a couple knives I realized a fixture wasn't necessary for me anyways. One tip I can give is since you likely have a weak side for grinding, finish that side first. This way it may be easier to match up your strong side because you have a bit more control. Keep us posted.
     
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  3. MarkJeffrey

    MarkJeffrey Member

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    I'd suggest sticking to the top design for a while, straight plunge in and straight across with the grind. Not saying you have to,. but that knife will be the easier of the two to get the hang of.

    I wear a head lamp on the chin of my mask to cast a shadow between the blade and the belt, so I know where its sitting, and to make sure I'm not hitting the edge hard every time. When I started (not that long ago at all) I had the problem of grinding the edge too thin right off the get go,. so I resorted to that and still do it.
     
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  4. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    I like the top design a lot better myself :) The bottom one is something my partner liked so since she puts up with me she gets what she likes.

    I tried wearing a headlamp and the angle wasn't right, didn't think to put it on the chin of my mask though. I'll have to give that a go. Can't really grind at night as the lighting in my shop isn't great, working on that too.
     
  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    I also like the top knife. The grinds don't look too bad. They should get tighter when you go up in grits.

    For a while I used one of these $10 work lamps from Ikea: http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/catalog/products/20370383/
    Now I have an LED work lamp on my grinder which has a gooseneck and can be positioned any old way. Really handy.

    Dan
     
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  6. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    Gooseneck is a great idea. I'll have to see if I can dig one up.. Added wrinkle is usually i'm grinding in my driveway so the lighting is good while the sun's out heheh.

    They turned out ok, for a first effort i'm happy with them. Just haven't had time to work on anything the last few days as I broke my toe on Sunday so no standing for me for a bit. I've been itching to get back to them though.
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    Never good. :-(
     
  8. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    At least I didn't drop the half dozen bottles of wine I was carrying ;)
     
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  9. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    Did some clean up sanding on the funny shaped one, up to 320 and it's looking good. Learned a valuable lesson when checking out which pins I wanted to use... Test fitting is your friend. Drilled 1/4" holes for my 1/4" mosaic pins that I made. Half of them would only go through the tang and then get hung up on the burr. An easy fix now with a AO cone stone on the dremel, probably not so much after heat treating.

    Speaking of which, went to fire up the forge and forgot I had to poach my propane tank for the BBQ. Oops. Guess I better get the spare filled tomorrow :) Too dark for pics. I'll snap a few tomorrow hopefully.
     
  10. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    Another thing to take care of the burrs ia a counter sink. If you buy one make sure you get a good quality one. I have seen the cheap ones get rid of the original burr but create 2 burrs. One on top and bottom of the he chamfer.

    You will also find that many times when you drill thru the handle material the hole will end up tight. I think that is a good thing because I like to fit the pins to the handle.
     
  11. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    Any idea where to get a good countersink? My options are sort of limited in Prince George :) Finding one that the packaging even said it would work on metal was a challenge.

    They're still tight, the pins won't drop through and you have to rotate them a bit to wiggle them through, but before the burr was keeping me from putting it all the way through the tang without using a hammer.
     
  12. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    It sounds like the fit I usually go for in the tang. You can try to find an industrial supplier around your area. Canadian tire may have them or princess auto. Not the best quality but okay.
     
  13. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    I did find some at princess auto but assumed the quality was a bit dubious. Guess I'll pick them up anyhow and try. For now my dremel will do the job.

    Thanks for the info!
     
  14. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    No problem. If the price is right give it a shot. When you use it remember to run it at a very low rpm. Less than 100 if your drill press goes that low and it takes very little pressure. With a nice sharp counter sink I will sometimes even hold and turn it in my hand if I just want to take off a burr.
     
  15. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    Do you have an Acklands-Grainger in Prince George? I got a Bosch one on Amazon.ca and it's lasted for a few years.

    I sometimes use a freshly sharpened oversized bit. Say at 3/8" bit for the 1/4" hole. Put it in the drill press and just kiss it. It makes a clean deburr.

    Dan
     
  16. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    I think there is one yes. I know I can always buy stuff online, but I prefer to try locally first just so I can see what i'm getting beforehand. I'll check Acklands out and then Amazon if not. Thanks!
     
  17. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    Not QUITE finished yet, but I had to show you all some pics.

    Still need to sharpen them and do the finish on the scales, but I spent a lot of time on the grinder and sanding last night so it's nice to have something to show :)

    Rosewood handle, homemade mosaic pins. Hand rubbed blade to 600 grit.
    [​IMG]


    Homemade micarta and pins, ricasso polised to 2000 grit and left the blade at the 240 grit from the grinder.
    [​IMG]
     
  18. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    Holy crap you been busy!
    Good work man. The handle shape on the blue on is very cool.
    They both turned out really well. Great job on the mosaic pins too!

    Dan
     
  19. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    These ones were interesting, not much to hold onto when you're grinding. But I fixed a lot of the things I messed up on my first knives, these are much better overall. Still lots of room for improvement.

    One thing I found odd... the grinds on the blue handled one are evenish. On the other one they're not. I'll take some pics to illustrate. But both of the ones that I did in the Rosewood style had the same issue. Just found it strange that the third knife did not. Not sure what I did differently.
     
  20. Slannesh

    Slannesh Active Member

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    Now that i'm looking at the pics I think this is the smiley thing you were talking about before.


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     

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