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First Blank And Bevel Done

Discussion in 'Working the Steel' started by SDMay, May 12, 2016.

  1. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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    First off sorry for the picture quality. Only so much a guy can do with his phone. I had my blank roughed out for a bit and had started my bevels with files but it was taking too much time. I ordered a 1x30 King sander and went town. Here is what I have so far. I see some flaws but I would like to hear what you have to say. Please let me know what I need to fix/work on.

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  2. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    for the Ricasso I use 400 or 500 grit and work the profile on the edge of the belt nice and slowly. Helps to have the belt just slightly off the platen so it folds over giving you a nice radius. Getting it even just takes a little practice, or you chase it back into the handle with a whole bunch of cursing right before it gets tossed into a scrap bucket:whistling
     
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  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Take your time. The knife will last forever.

    Sometimes I match the bevels at the plunge lines with a round file. This gives more precise control compared to a belt.
    I also use good old sheet sandpaper and a block with some 100 grit wet/dry and little water to work the bevels into the shape I want. Being the beginner grinder than I am, I resort to the old school methods to get the bevels and plunges to look good. I have a board like this:

    [​IMG]

    Take your edge down to about a dime thickness (around 1 mm or about 0.050")
    Also, be sure to layout your handle and drill any holes before heat treatment.

    Dan
     
  5. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    It's looking good. As the others have said, cleaning up the plunge lines can be finicky. It takes patience (and occasionally luck) to get them perfectly even.

    Given how straight your blade is, I might have opted for a three-quarter grind to add some visual interest. Just personal taste.
     
  6. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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    Thanks for the replies guys. I have been reading so much that I began to over think it so it was damn the cannons and away we go.

    My next step is to get out the paper and a file and clean things up. I know that my blade is a bit wavy and I will clean up the plunge at that time as well as I can.

    My thickness at the tip is less then the dime that is preferred for heat treat so should I take a bit off to get it down to that thickness? I am going use a torch and mapp gas to do my heat treat as I don't have a forge setup yet and I figured that if I focused on the spine the heat should travel through without a problem and won't overheat the edge.

    Myth I am going to tackle a less then full grind in the future but I thought that a full would be better for my first so I didn't have to stress about getting my lines to match up. I am grinding free hand so I am trying to make it as simple as I can.

    My next one is going to be for the KITH as I don't think I can get this one to look good enough to match up to the quality of some of the other guys but who knows.
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I think the idea of the the dime thickness is to have a little meat on there when quenching so the edge doesn't go wavy like a piece of bacon. I've gone less and suffered no ill effects. You should be fine.

    Not sure what steel you are using. For 1084 for example, when heating make sure the blade is a bit hotter than the non-magnetic temperature. As your are heating up, touch it with a magnet. You'll find there is a temperature where the magnet doesn't stick anymore. It will be red. Give 'er a little bit more heat and hit the oil right away.

    Good luck!

    Dan
     
  8. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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    Forgot that part. Yes it is 1/8 1084. Blade width is around 5/8 so that is why I thought to focus on the spine and let it heat through.
     
  9. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    As long as the edge is reaching the right temperature. That is ultimately what needs to be hardened.

    Dan
     
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  10. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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    Well an hours worth of draw filing and most of my grinding marks are out. A little bit more and I am on to paper.
     
  11. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    It's a slog, but the thing to remember is you're crafting a tool that can last a lifetime.
    Keep it up and you'll be impressing yourself in no time.

    Dan
     
  12. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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    It is a lot of work but it is nice to be able to disconnect my brain and have a focus. The only thing is that I don't get a lot of time to do it.
     
  13. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Well... i tried another bevel last night. Meant it to be a wide scandi. Did one side and it looked great. Right up to the line and I'm thinking "man, this is not that hard". Then i had to go the other way using my off hand. The clamp wouldn't work on the jig because it hit the arm of the grinder so i had to "hold" it in place. I did 3 passes and checked and had grind marks all over the place. I dunno... I can't explain. So it became a full flat practice instead (actually sort of a convex grind really).

    I have to figure out how to hold the knife at the consistent angle, no matter what - offhand or no. Is there a jig that you guys started with that works well? I've burned through about 5 test blanks now and i keep getting oddities with at least one side of the blade. Usually it acts like i went from about 4.5 degrees to about 1 degree on the other side. I am careful to clamp it flat and in the same position. I even marked it. Is there a gotcha i'm not aware of when flipping the blank?

    I with i was good enough to free hand it. Seems like much less hassle. Bottom line, still nothing worthy of showing you guys.
     
  14. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Getting a consistent, even grind on both sides, even with a jig, takes a lot of practice. It's part physics, part art, and part voodoo.
    • When you're grinding, try to maintain a consistent stance in front of the grinder and use your body rather than your arms to help keep the angles steady.
    • When using a jig, it's really important to make sure your blank is straight and flat -- a small bow in the length of the blank will have a huge effect on the grind.
    • Start with your offhand side, as it's easier to match that grind. Even better, work both sides equally so you can see how it's going.
    A good compromise between a solid jig and freehand might be something like Fred Rowes Bubble Jig. It lets you work freehand while maintaining the correct bevel angle.
     
  15. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    oh and one other one, make sure belt is tight on the grinder. had one that stretched a little and made a slight wave in the profile, spent a couple hours filing the surface flat then polishing by hand.

    should have thrown that belt out (is gone now) but did it to myself again a few weeks back but luckily I caught it early enough
     
  16. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Grinding nice even bevels is deceptively difficult to do.

    Another tip is slow down and take a lot of light passes. I lose count most of the time, but say 60 or more passes to bring the coarse bevel on. This way it's easier to make corrections. You can always take more off, but never put any back.

    Dan
     
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  17. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    unless you want to learn how to weld tool steel at 400F and build it back up? much more painful than it sounds:D
     
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  18. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    I've been practicing (a lot) on some scrap. I took as many of the suggestions i got here as i could remember and basically just took my time and ended up with a decent result. I ended up using the jig i made but i had to make a small mod to my grinder to make room for the jig and my fingers to pass by when moving right to left. I guess i'm still perfecting my grinder design too really. Anyway, the blade is still just mild steel because i still needed the practice. I think I'm about ready to mess up on something more expensive now. Trial by fire right? Anyway, here's a pic of what i hope is my final test run. I only managed to get one snap on my phone before the battery died so, i'll add more later. The bevel still isn't perfect, i didn't sand out all the grind marks properly and there's discolourations from the cheap steel but it's miles ahead of my first attempts. Overall, for a cheap piece of steel and a guy who's never worked metal before, i'm pretty happy with it as a starting point. Thanks for all the help here guys. I'm sure i'll be needing more as i learn more.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I think you're ready to work on some high carbon steel. :)
     
  20. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    seriously? it seems like all i an see is flaws. I don't want to waste anything too expensive. When i look at some of the knives being made here i just think, wow i have a long way to go.
     

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