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Desert ironwood hunter.

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by Icho-, Aug 11, 2014.

  1. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    This is my first knife in a little while. O-1 blade with ss bolsters, mosaic pins and desert ironwood scales. I am very disappointed in the way this one turned out. This is the blade that the holes were oversized. The pins were bigger than I normally use and I thought I peened them enough. Now I have 3 visible pins in the bolsters. Well here it is.

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  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    Sorry to hear about the pins. From the photos it doesn't look so bad. Lines look good and the blade and bolster polished up well.

    If I remember correctly you had discovered a wobbly bit and went up in size. Did you use a pin reamer to taper the pin holes in the bolster pieces? I'd like to get the pins invisible. Seems to be a bit of a trick.

    Dan
     
  3. FORGE

    FORGE Active Member

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    Icho, pins can either make or break a knife.
    Here is how I do mine. When I first started making knives I would peen them with a hammer and that just not seem to do the job on most knives so I made a pin press. Mine will push about 25 tons which is way to much a, 5 ton will work just fine.
    The two biggest problems with hiding the pins is the hole is to large in diameter for the pin and the hole is not cleaned out properly,by that I mean there is cutting oil or buffing compound in the holes and no matter how hard you push that pin in if there is oil in the hole the pin will be visible.
    Here is what I do if the pins are smaller in diameter than the hole.
    I will take and grind the outside diameter of the drill bit to make it a few thousands smaller. You just want to be able to push the pins in the bolster holes.
    Lightler sand the pin with 400 grit to clean the surface.
    Get some pipe cleaners and soak them in acetone and run them through the bolster holes and holes in the knife blank to make sure then are clean.

    The slotted plates are used to squeeze the bolster flat to the knife before the pins are peened.
    The little washers are used to make sure the pin does not slide up flush with the bolster because if it did you would never be able to squeeze it an peen it.

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  4. Foster J

    Foster J Active Member

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    I like the design with the swoopy bolster and iron wood is my favorite. Real good looking knife Icho.
    Thanks Cal for the little tutorial. My pins have also been hit and miss. I'm going to press the hell out of my next ones.
     
  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    That's great info Cal. Thanks for the insight. Here I was using a ball-pein hammer!
     
  6. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    Ya Dan. It was actually a new sharpened off center drill. I did use a tapered reamer as usual. I think this is the first time the pins didn't turn out for me. This was supposed to be posted a couple hours ago and I just realized I didn't click post reply. lol

    Cal. Thank you for the great little tutorial. For the cleaning part I do pretty much the same thing accept for the pipe cleaner part which I will be investing in some for the next bolsters I do. much easier than using the corner of a cloth. I have been wondering about one of those little manual arbor presses and the only reason I haven't gotten one yet is because I wasn't sure if it would be enough to compress a .125 pin. I will look into a hydraulic shop press since they have many uses. I usually have to sand the pins so that they are a snug fit in the bolsters. Do you taper the holes in the bolster? That is something I do just before I do the final cleaning and assembly. I have a couple more knives started that I will be taking your approach for the bolsters. You are right about pins making or breaking a knife because I feel this one is broken. I wasn't even going to post this knife but I am glad I did.

    Thanks Joe. This is my first time using ironwood and definitely not my last.
     
  7. FORGE

    FORGE Active Member

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    I NEVER taper ream the hole in the bolster all you are doing is removing more material that you have to fill with a "squished" pin. The theory works good for a rivet on a piece of steel that you want to rivet together and don't care it you see the rivet mark but on a knife bolster we are looking for a "clean" fit.
     
  8. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    I never tried not tapering the holes because I was worried that the bolsters could back off. Yet another thing to try next time.
     

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