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D i y - small wheel attachment kit

Discussion in 'How I Made It: Tutorials' started by dancom, Jun 23, 2014.

  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Small Wheel Attachment

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    A belt grinder with a flat platen is great, but versatility rules. It becomes very clear that a way to shape inside curves with any grit is a must for any knifemaker. After taking a look at some different designs and I settled on the KMG style. I came up with a way to do it that doesn't cost an arm and a leg based on my simple drum sanding kit that I used all the time in my drill press.

    The core of this build is a 2" drum sanding kit.

    [​IMG]

    These rubber drums are 2" long and various diameters. The kit that I bought (Big Horn) has 1/2", 3/4", 1" and 1-1/2" diameters. Be alert that not all drum sander kits are 2" long. Some are 1" and they are common. Check before you buy. The shanks are 1/4" in diameter, but a 5/16" rod makes a much tighter fit inside the rubber.

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    These are typical rubber drums.

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    For bearings I chose 1603-Zs as they have a 5/15" inside diameter. The outside diameter is 7/8". It was a whopping $24 for 10 of these little bad boys at BearingsCanada.com.

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    Finding a piece of pipe that has a 7/8" inside diameter was a bit of a trick, but I managed to re-purpose a furniture leg from Ikea. It is nickel plated so I stripped the plating off with the sander. The fit is not tight, but within a few thousandths.

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    For the frame I have some 1/4" bar stock. I cut it into two 6" pieces.

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    After cutting a section off the end of the pipe, I cut it in half. This leaves us with two semi circles. I aligned the edge of the bearing with the end of the frame .

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    Quick clamp to hold while welding. This is thin wall tubing, so low heat is in order.

    Here is the layout for the frame pieces

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Once the semi circles are welded I ground them down to about 3/8". I then clamped and drilled the mounting holes. The aim is align the half circles before clamping. I marked them at 1/2" and then 4-1/2" in from the end.

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    The finished holes are 5/16", but you could use 3/8" if that is convenient.

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    A piece of 1-1/2" angle is cut to 5-3/4" and drilled to match. I wanted to keep the wheel as forward as possible so I drilled the front hole 1/2" from the end.

    The marks on the bottom are for mounting the angle to the tool bar. On my grinder this is 1-1/2" square H.S.S. with a 3/16" wall. I'll make these 5/16 x 5/8" slots.

    For my grinder I figured I would need a 19" tool arm. You'll have to figure it out for your grinder. Count on it being at least a few inches more than your flat platen tool arm. The tool arm has to be drilled and tapped to mount the assembly. Clamp and mark where the holes have to go and then punch, drill and tap. Use a little oil or cutting fluid when you are tapping. This part here you're on your own. Figure it out to work on your grinder.

    [​IMG] This is a test fit after drilling and tapping.

    For spacers I used some pipe. As these spacers are on end compression, they don't have to be superwalled. I'd bet some nuts and washers on the ready-rod would be just fine. I cut the spacers at 3-1/4". This is the important dimension.

    The 5/16" ready-rod was cut to 4 -1/2" long and the thread finished on the ends.

    After your test fitting, give it a shot of paint. If you can find a 1-1/2" glide (Casterland) they will give your tool bar a sweet capped and finished looking end.

    [​IMG]

    to be continued due to character limit...
     
  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Continued from above...

    Making The Wheels
    The wheels consist of three parts. The shaft, the rubber and the bearings.

    [​IMG]

    For a shaft, I used some 5/16" SS 304 round stock cut to 3-3/16" in length for the shaft. Once cut, I trued and chamfered the ends.


    [​IMG]

    A 1603-Z bearing is pressed on one end (I used a vise and a 3/8" nut to protect the bearing) I then applied some contact cement to the middle section of the rod. I then pressed the rubber drum on. For these drums this was already a tight fit and needed a little work with a mallet.

    Right away I pressed the second bearing on. The rubber cement takes a few minutes to set, so once the second bearing is on, slide the rubber as evenly between the two bearings as soon as you can. Wipe off excess cement that squeezes out the ends of the rubber.

    Once the cement sets the wheel is ready to use. Give it a few hours.

    [​IMG]

    Repeat this process for the different sizes. Always take care not to crush the bearing when pressing them on the shaft.

    I let the contact cement dry overnight and so far there have been no problems. Of course you'll need to make sure they are running true. Frame alignment is important. If you see the rubber drums sliding to one side, you have alignment issues.

    I will note here that the 1/2" diameter drum was pretty messed up from use on my drill press. I have another kit coming so I can make a full set.

    The last step is to align the frame assembly. You will need to adjust the two mounting bolts to get the wheels to run as square as possible. It was fairly quick for me. I had to take the belt off, loosen, adjust and re-tighten. Once it's running true, you shouldn't have to adjust it.

    The total cost for this project was about $58 if you don't count shop supplies and miscellaneous hardware bits and pieces.

    If you have any questions of ideas please let me know.

    Best of luck in all your projects!

    Dan
     
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  3. donnymac250

    donnymac250 Member

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    nice job dan , may have to try this . thanks
     
  4. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    Very nice job Dan. I used the rubber wheels from my mastercraft oscillating drum Sanders. I grabbed a couple flange bearings from princess auto and put a shaft thru them. The shaft stays with the arm and I just change the wheels to the desired diameter. I can still use the wheels on the drum Sanders so it is set up right next to my belt grinder. The bearings are noisy but I get by with it for now. I would definitely like to make something more permanent some day. Maby what you have here.
     
  5. Alexander13

    Alexander13 Member

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    Awesome little set up Dan!
     
  6. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    nice Dan
    always like the interesting back yard shop designs and home brew ingenuity !!
    there is a build on Blade Forums that is almost identical to yours Dan, only difference is he used magnetic bearing housings
    for those without, variable speed is a must with small wheel or your bearings wont last long
    Rob at Beaumont Metal Works has mastered the small wheel attachment, worth a look
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I was, at one point, considering using small magnets to hold the wheels in place before the belt tension is on them. I found it's not difficult to pop the wheel in, hold it while slipping the belt on applying tension. I have no idea about magnetic bearing housings for speed or slip management. Curious as to how that works. Possibly like a clutch.

    Yes, speed will kill the little guys and you certainly need to run the drive wheel much slower. Imagine a 4" drive wheel running a 1/2" contact wheel then hit the switch and whoom the little guy is running over 27,000 RPM. I have the luxury of having a VFD.

    Dan
     
  8. Fred/A

    Fred/A Active Member

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    Really interesting post, thank you for sharing.
     
    dancom likes this.

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