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Contact wheel- 8 or 10? Serr or smooth?

Discussion in 'Grinders' started by Grayzer86, Mar 21, 2013.

  1. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Hey guys, i am in need of a contact wheel for my home built 2x72, and have a few questions. I would love a ten inch contact wheel, but the price jump of roughly 150 dollars between 8 and 10 makes me wonder if an 8 would still be fine for me, and be cheaper. For now the wheel will be mostly used for hogging, however i would also like to be able to hollow grind with it eventually. Most of my knives are 1/8 or 3/16 stock, with the odd one going up to 1/4, but very rarely. Rarely enough i could just flat grind those ones. My question is what do you guys use, and what size do you think is the best? Secondly, i am stuck between smooth or serated face. They say a serrated is more aggressive, and hogs faster, but also runs cooler and extends belt life. The serrated wheel however says that it does not leave quite as nice of a finish at higher grits when finishing hollow grinds. Any advice on this part? Due to the cost of these wheels being roughly what it cost to build my whole grinder, i would like to do some research before dropping 300+ bucks on one.
     
  2. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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    Grayzer I use a 8" smooth and I find it great.. Now for hollow grinds on an 8" wheel you can go roughly a 1/2" grind on the bevel for a true hollow grind. It is possible to go a little higher but it takes very steady hands. As far as serrated wheels the will chew the steel better but a smooth with 36G belts I can assure you chews just as we'll if your grinder has the power. I love my smooth when finish sanding because if you accidentally have a little slip it will at worse be a minor scratch and easy to fix. After tons of grinding on the smooth there is zero wear on the wheel surface as well so that's good news..
     
  3. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    Check out www.sunray-inc.com for prices. I have heard of people getting contact wheels from them. If they don't it have they will make it.
     
  4. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Thanks for the link Icho. I will be sure to check them out. Steve, what brand of a wheel are you running? i see the Beaumont wheels are vulcanized rubber, and the other ones i was looking at are poly, the poly ones i have used as idlers and small contacts have held up well, so i assume the larger polys will too.
     
  5. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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  6. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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  7. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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    Homemade 2x72 Rob :D

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Nice grinder Steve, but curious, is there a reason you are running a 60 duro wheel rather than a 70? Anyone I know that uses one seems to run a 70 duro, but I also have no idea how much difference there really is between the two. I built a NWGS also and can't believe that nobody has picked up using those u bolts for the tool arm. That needs to be incorporated into the standard plans man. Would have saved me a but of frustration when bolting it all up with just one set of hands.
     
  9. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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    Lol!!! Totally Grayzer, I built mine by looking at a picture on google images and I thought the way they did the tool arms were way over complicated and had to many knuckle skinners and shirt catchers hanging off of them...so the Ubolts were nice and clean looking and you are both hands free puting it together!! Ok so I went with the 60duro bearings on the wheel because they were cheaper and I have a 1725RPM motor driving it. The 70's and higher you will only see a difference if you run around 3000rpm with a VFD but even at higher speeds you'll probably never run anywhere close to that more like around 2200rpm anything above and you should stockpile belts...lol!! The 60duro I use I don't see any issues with lag or smoothness and it spins flawless at 17-1800rpm
     
  10. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    I am of the understanding that the Durometer rating is a measure of the density or stiffness of the surface of the wheel. Higher duro ratings being stiffer. I have been told a 60 will give and compress slightly more than a 70, but have seen wheels as low as 40 duro for finishing, and as high as 90 for surface grinders that had been converted to run belts.
     
  11. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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    You are 100% correct Grayzer but at speeds like 1700rpm the bearings won't generate enough heat to result in any give to the bearings themselves.
     

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