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Composite Wa Build

Discussion in 'How I Made It: Tutorials' started by dancom, Nov 5, 2016.

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  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Cocobolo, brass, Acryleser and African Blackwood.
    [​IMG]
    Planning for the handle pattern. Fibre spacers are optional.

    [​IMG]
    More planning for the glue up,

    Gluing.
    [​IMG]

    Jam lots of epoxy into the hole. A popsicle stick works okay for this.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Stack the pieces up. Every face gets epoxy. Too much is okay!

    [​IMG]
    Clamp with medium pressure and
    -- 36 hours later...

    [​IMG]
    Belt sander to flatten and square the surfaces.

    [​IMG]
    Then o the platen to cut 90° angles in half.


    [​IMG]

    The same process goes until 600 grit, then it's buffer time. This is with green abrasive on the wheel.
    [​IMG]

    All this needs is a blade.
    [​IMG]

    Thanks for looking!

    Dan
     
  2. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Very nice it's going to look even better with the blade into it.
     
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  3. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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    Nice work as usual Dan. Assuming from the length that this is for a full size kitchen knife? How wide is the cross section? I am delving into handles next weekend for my paring knives.
     
  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    It's for a small honesuki style knife. Blade is around 110mm.
    The handle is It's 22mm x 100mm. You can see in the proportions in the last image in this post.


    [​IMG]
    Using the drill press and vise like a poor man's milling machine.


    [​IMG]
    Broaching the slot with a jig saw blade.


    [​IMG]
    Alternate broaching tool.


    [​IMG]
    This is the fit. A small gap to clean up with a needle file.

    After it's glued, etched and sharpened I'll post some more photos.

    Dan
     
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  5. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    I used the same saw blade when working on final fitup of a wood sheath and it works like a charm. Guess I should have kept it handy for future use instead of tossing it.

    out of curiosity what size of tang, and rough wood stock did you use?
     
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    The tang tapers from 5/8" down to 3/8" in height over about 2-1/2". And from a little over 3/32" thick at the shoulder to slightly thinner at the end. I drilled the handle with 5/64" bits, broached and then filed a little with a flat needle file.

    The pieces I cut at about 1-1/4" square (more or less). After squaring and shaping the handle ends up just under a 1".

    Dan
     
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  7. Jim T

    Jim T Active Member

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    I love those tutorials of yours, Dan! Always well done and informative.

    Jim T
     
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  8. james Cuff

    james Cuff New Member

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    Nice work Dan, thank you for posting this. I have a question on glue up for a composite handle where the joints are not at 90 degrees to the tang. I've attempted to do a 45-degree cocobolo, copper, and maple burl, but couldn't manage to clap it effectively. Has anyone had success doing this? If so I would love to hear about it.
     
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  9. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    I made a frame to jam the parts up against plus clamps to hold down. Only ran into a problem with G10 spacers as they like to pop up out of place after a couple of hours if there is to much pressure sideways.
     
  10. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Hi James,

    Are you thinking like a scarf joint, where the two piece's faces meet at an angle? (Some makers call this a dovetail, but that's another issue.) The time I attempted it, I set the disc sander table to 45° and bevelled the two bolster pieces and two handle pieces. Then pinned the bolster the tang. Then epoxied and pinned the handle pieces. Once it was all dry the handle and bolster were shaped as though they are one piece. It takes some attention to detail to pull this off as even a small difference in the right and left side is noticeable. Needless to say, I wasn't overly happy with my first attempt. One piece of advice (from experience) is do not, for whatever reason, adjust the angle of your table until all the pieces are done and test fitted. I use this same method when a bolster pieces are steel. They go down on the tang first, then the scales go on.

    In the case of dissimilar materials like wood and copper, it would be ideal to provide some very small (1/16") pins (I used pieces of small finishing nails) to mechanically join the pieces and stop them from shifting during clamp up.

    Copper will heat during shaping and the epoxy can fail at the flattening step (again from experience). Once that whole mess is pinned and epoxied to the tang it's much safer to shape, but you still need to watch the heat.

    A clamping jig can help too.
    [​IMG]

    Hope this helps.

    Dan
     
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  11. james Cuff

    james Cuff New Member

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    Dan,

    That is great info and awesome tips. I hit some of the same issues you talked about with my joint not being 100% accurate and therefore failing during glue up. Adding pins to the bolster and attaching that to the blade before the rest of the scales makes total sense. Also your little glue up jig would come in very handy, I will be making one of those nest time for sure. I'm currently working on a little drop point hunter that I want to bolster so I'll be using some of your tips to hopefully have a little more success than my last attempt.

    Cheers,

    james.
     
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