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Cold Bluing A Knife

Discussion in 'Fit & Finish' started by John Noon, Jan 16, 2016.

  1. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Well to start with I was curious as to the effects of vinegar on 1084 steel, made a wannabe chefs knife and it is not likely to be finished due to staining and rusting from food contact.

    Instead of ten or fifteen minutes the knife soaked over night in vinegar which turned it black, cleaned it off and there was a pretty permanent stain that did not come off with a scrub pad.

    Today I thought that cold bluing might take since the blade was already etched, so under the hot water tap until the steel was nice and warm. Then dry quickly and wipe down with cold bluing, until color was even.
    Buff with 0000 steel wool until finish was even and wipe down with food grade mineral oil.
    [​IMG]

    there is a very noticeable line along the cutting edge with a few shades of purple and blue for the different levels of hardness.

    Muriatic acid will probably work better and will be tried with the next knife, picked up some clay so there will also be an attempt at creating a Hamon.

    John
     
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  2. bobbybirds

    bobbybirds Active Member

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    I personally really like the patina development with 1084 steel. If I was making a chef knife for myself, this or 1095 is what I would be making it out of for sure.
     
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  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Only catch with these steels is they will rust quickly with acidic foods. Easy to work around if cleaned right after use.
     
  4. bobbybirds

    bobbybirds Active Member

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    I have lots of carbon steel pocket knives that see a ton of abuse from acidic foods, chemical at work, and all sorts of stuff. Realistically they never get much more than a wipe on my jeans and snapped closed. Once in a blue moon I wash them in mild soap and water and oil the hinge and wipe the blade with paper towel dipped in olive oil or camellia oil, but truly that is usually all. I have never experienced a rusty blade.

    That said, of course a blade will rust if you leave it in moisture or an acidic environment for long periods of time and never wipe your blade, but rust should not be an issue for anyone who actually uses a knife on a regular basis and takes even a tiny amount of care with it.
     

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