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Chainsaw Bar Knife

Discussion in 'Steel, Hardware, & Handle Material' started by BeeVee, Dec 16, 2016.

  1. BeeVee

    BeeVee New Member

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    I'm going to cut out a few throwing knife blades from some old Oregon bars used on Husqvarna chain saws. If the steel is good i might make a few different items.
    Anyone use these bars to make good knives?
     
  2. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    I did try to harden chainsaw bar material once. I never had much success. I'm not sure what kind of steel it is but it's not simple carbon steel.
     
  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Composition will depend on industrial or residential use as well as the manufacturer. what might work is cut two pieces like so I-I making a "H" or something with notches.

    Heat to 1475-1500 hold for a minute then quench one in water and the other in Canola heated to 130F. Having drilled two holes for further stress risers may be a good idea, check for hardness after sanding of scale. If the water one breaks then you can be confident the carbon is above 1084 or a combination of alloys that has a very high carbon equivalent.
     
  4. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Breaking when quenched in water is not really an indication of the carbon content being at .84%. 1060, 1075, 5160, can all be broken by a water quench. In a violent water quench, 4140 which is only .34-.43 carbon and hits a max of around 59 in a perfect quench, can fracture and i have seen it on a couple axes. I have personally had a tomahawk in 1050 crack in a water quench also. While i agree that a quench test will help verify harden-ability, stress fracturing isnt necessarily telling of anything specific. W2 is extremely high in carbon, as are the hitatchi steels, and they are all water or brine quenched frequently without fractures.

    As to the original question, its probably fine for some simple throwers as its designed to be relatively shock resistant and flexible, but i would doubt it would be of a composition that would hold a reasonable edge on a normal knife. I have seen this done on several other forums, and typically they find that the steel wont harden up enough to hold much of a cutting edge. Just my 2 cents.
     
  5. BeeVee

    BeeVee New Member

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    Thanks guys .
    My two younger grandsons(11 & 14) are very interested in throwing hatchets & knives (esp. the younger) so I will cut out a couple of 12 " ones to start off .
     
  6. BeeVee

    BeeVee New Member

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    Too busy with getting the shack out for ice-fishing to do any fabricating !
     
  7. mervin lott

    mervin lott New Member

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    chain saws have been my lifes work..as well as throwing knives an tomahawks ..LOL . i would not waste my time with an orgon bar. if you could find a canon , or an tzumara for knives.but by the time you get the rails off they are not deep enough for a hawk....but a wood proseser bar would be perfect
     

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