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Buffing...

Discussion in 'Fit & Finish' started by poppa bear, Jan 5, 2016.

  1. poppa bear

    poppa bear Member

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    OK so in my journey's today I found myself at crappytire. So I picked up a buffing wheel for the bench grinder and green compound.

    Tried it out and got that green compound all over my blade and no shine.

    I've been using a feather light touch like I have been reading to do but still lost...

    Looking for help as I'm tired of using my angel grinder and fapping wheel as it's thining out the profile and giving uneven shine.
     
  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Hi Poppa,

    I use an underpowered Delta bench grinder with a 5" or 6" buffing wheel and for the most part black and green compound.

    Although I hate buffing blades, because very experienced knifemakers have died doing so, I do occasionally to "reveal" scratches in the blade when finishing.

    After sanding to around 400 grit, I sometimes buff with black compound. If any scratches are revealed, I go back and fix them with the appropriate grit. Sometimes I have to go back to 220 or so and work back to 400.
    With a small bench grinder you will have to apply moderate pressure, almost to the point of stalling that puny motor.

    You will want to take the stock guards and tool rests off machine. Work under the wheel as it will be moving away from you down there. If your grip slips or the wheel grabs the piece, the blade will shoot (hopefully) away from you and stab into the wall and not into some part of your human body.

    I buff assembled handles all the time. Again the underside of the wheel, with a firm two-handed grip and a taped up blade. So far I am not dead, but I am being extremely careful and know how the wheel can catch on certain shapes. For scales and bolster pieces I may use a vise-grip to hold the piece(s) especially if they are small like a bolster.

    I always mask up and wear an apron and face shield when buffing. Those wheels throw fibres and compound everywhere. One black booger day and you'll always be wearing a mask.

    [​IMG]

    In the photo you will see a wooden "backstop" that keeps the mess confined to a smaller area.

    I hope this helps.

    Be safe,

    Dan
     
  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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  4. poppa bear

    poppa bear Member

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    Thanks guys thumbs up
     

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