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Back Spacer Thickness On Liner Lock

Discussion in 'Design' started by Jim T, Apr 2, 2020.

  1. Jim T

    Jim T Active Member

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    I've been trying to figure out how to make the back spacer of a liner lock the proper thickness. I understand that the spacer has to be the thickness of the blade plus the 2 washers.

    My question is: Is there a way to hand make a back spacer of even thickness throughout with only basic tools? I don't have a surface grinder or a milling machine. I'm using micarta for the spacer material (although I would eventually like to use stainless). According to my calipers I'm always a tiny bit off on one end or the other. Very frustrating.

    Help please...

    Jim T
     
  2. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Perhaps you need to turn your thinking around. Make the back spacer the width of your blade steel, then grind the tang until it moves freely.
     
  3. Jim T

    Jim T Active Member

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    Is that the way it's done? Yeesh, then I'm going to have get better at grinding!
     
  4. boatbuilder

    boatbuilder New Member

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    I always grind my blade based on my backspacer thickness. I've been using 316SS for a backspacer and its non magnetic so its hard to hold down to mag chuck to surface grind. Ever think about building a surface grinding attachment for your 2x72? Not that difficult at all.
     
  5. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    I don't know if it's "the way", but it's a way. I've done it with slip joints and lock backs when the fit is too tight.

    You can grind your backspacer as you've been doing too. What you need is a good flat surface. If you don't mind a few hours of work, you can tape down some sandpaper on a piece of glass and rub the piece over that, checking it every few minutes to see the fit (more as it gets close). If you want to speed the process or need to take off more, you can do the same thing by clamping a good new flat file to your bench and pushing the piece along it (sort of reverse filing). Or get yourself a lap wheel and let electricity do the work.

    Edit: Whatever method you choose, plan to wear out a set of screws while you're doing all the test fitting, so don't use expensive ones until it's done.
     
  6. Jim T

    Jim T Active Member

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    Hmm... To be honest, I've never considered the possibility of building an attachment (although I've always coveted the surface grinder in your shop, Jim!). I'll have to give it some thought.

    Good advice. I've wrecked or wasted some good materials because I thought I jumped to the next step without due thought. Gotta learn to reign in that impatience, I guess.
     

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