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Arced Grind Line Technique

Discussion in 'Working the Steel' started by dancom, Nov 5, 2020.

  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    I have been working on this freehand arced grind-line technique. Trying to get a nice curved line, but it takes some patience on the flat platen. (I haven't ruined any blades yet, but came close)

    Some time ago, maybe four years, I recall reading a post on this forum, about using a large diameter contact wheel and some kind of pin to pivot the blade on to get nice sweeping curved grind lines. Anyone recall that post?

    [​IMG]

    Dan
     
  2. FORGE

    FORGE Active Member

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    Dan that is why I stay away from this area with my belt grinder and grind it in with my lap wheel.
    I only use my belt grinder for the rough material removal and all finish work is done on a lap wheel.
    The arc circumference of the disk will put in a ricasso curve on the blade.
     
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  3. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    This is how it ended up.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Joelsund

    Joelsund Active Member

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    Turned out very nice. Never tried anything like that.
     
  5. FORGE

    FORGE Active Member

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    Looks good .... but how long did it take you to do it and what are the chances of screwing it up ?
    On a lap wheel it would only take a short time and the chances of making a mistake are minimal.

    How many guys grind up on a 2x72 ? I have always ground a blade down on my belt grinder because that is the way I feel comfortable doing it. Different strokes for different folks. I guess if the process works then use it.
    I rum my hydraulic press with my hand rather than with a foot control because I feel I have more control and a better feel with my hand than foot when I am moving metal.
     
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    Thanks Cal,

    It didn't take too long to grind, maybe 25 minutes. I guess longer blades will take longer time. I don't usually go super heavy as I grind after heat treatment, so there's some water dunking going on. Lots of checking the taper and bevels. I use 36 grit VSMs to start and you know they cut pretty well, then a 60s, 120s, conditioning belt etc. A most important consideration, I didn't start with a 1/4" thick slab of steel to make a kitchen knife.

    I am a "different strokes" guy. I stand off to the the right side of the grinder and with the steel in my right hand. I make passes alternating between edge up and edge down. It's just something I got used to. If I am using the conditioning belts, I never go edge up. That's asking to get impaled. Don't ask me to teach a course on grinding. LOL

    I use my disc grinder more for flattening scales, squaring and flattening bolster pieces and what-not. It great at making flat surfaces. I will give it a try cutting some bevels as I have another kitchen knife coming through the system. What do you start at grit wise?

    Dan
     
  7. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    How is this grind accomplished? Standing at the contact wheel, and lets say you are controlling the handle with your right hand, and controlling the tip with the left. Is the blade held at a steep angle and feathered outwards the tip carefully, or feathered back to the plunge?

    I am having trouble with it as I am a visual learner, you can describe something to me til your blue in the face and I’ll still be staring at you with my head tilted like a dog that’s been asked a question :D

    I’ve always ground edge up by the way...I need to see that scribed centerline.
     
  8. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker

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    Griff, I am not a good example of ideal grinding and 'am probably doing this all wrong.

    With the flat platen, hold the blade approximately 10° off the belt, that's the orange thing in the images.
    [​IMG]
    Put a little more pressure on the front of the blade to make the distal taper. As you get near the heel, make sure the blade is about 45° off of horizontal. How you apply the pressure in the last inch of travel will determine the arc in the grind line.

    Dan
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2020
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  9. FORGE

    FORGE Active Member

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    Dan I usually start with VSM 36 or 50 grit depending on how much material I have to remove.
    Then is is off to the lap wheel where I have 36,50 80 and 120 grit disks. Then hand sand 240,320 and 400 grit.

    When I made a lot of stainless I used 320 , 400 and 600 grit disks on my lap wheel in order to get a good finish before buffing.

    I use 80, 240 and 400 J flex belts to do my handles and those are the only grits I use in my shop.
     
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  10. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    Thanks @dancom surprisingly exactly how I was picturing it hahaha!

    Thanks @FORGE for going over your process too, very interesting :beer::beer:
     
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