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A Forge And 2 Knives

Discussion in 'Forges, Ovens, Kilns, & Salt Pots' started by Alexander13, Aug 23, 2013.

  1. Alexander13

    Alexander13 Member

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    So the last long weekend I finally got my first forge going. It's a one brick forge, $50 knife shop kind, and a street car track anvil.
    I worked for a total of about 3 hours over 3 days and came away with 2 knives made from one old half round file.
    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]
    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]
    I had just cut the file in half on the edge of the "anvil".
    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]
    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]

    Here are the 2 knives that I managed to pound out of the file. The full tang oal, is 8", and is meant to be a little kitchen knife, maybe? While the hidden tang is 7 1/4" oal and is meant to be a sgian dubh (Scottish knife). I've started filing and will continue to work on them. But really I just want to forge more!

    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]
    Thanks for looking!
    Cheers
    Joel
     
  2. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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    Looks great Joel, good job!!!
     
  3. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Those are great looking blades.

    The forging bug seems to have reached epidemic status among the members here.
     
  4. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Myth is right. There seems to be a pile of makers gravitating towards forging recently, which is nice to see. It's fun, it allows far more creativity, and it can also make you pull your hair out when it goes wrong. I'm hooked now and bought a forge after my first day ever forging at a hammer in. It's also nice to be able to ht simple steels like 1084.
     
  5. FORGE

    FORGE Maker of the Year Best Knife

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    I hope you got good fire insurance !!!! :flame:
    A wooden workmate or table is really not a good place to sit a forge on.
    I have had two fires in my shop from hot grinding sparks and it is really not something I don't want to experience again.
     
  6. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    nice work Joel , those look great !!
     
  7. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Excellent work. I really like forged to shape full tang knives. My biggest issue is keeping them straight. As I usually end up forging some small twist into them. Keep up the good work
     
  8. Alexander13

    Alexander13 Member

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    You're absolutely right, thanks for the concern and advice, that's one lesson I don't want to learn the hard way! What's not in the picture is the bucket of water, I did have one off to the side just in case and I actually had the brick on 4 bolts(and 2 nails) to raise it up off the table and have since got a metal plate for everything to sit on. Now that I know it works well I'm building a small metal stand for it to go on before I fire it up again. I'm a glass blower by trade, so am very aware of the importance of fire proofing you work space.

    Any advice is always welcome, thank you!
     
  9. Ryan Ladurantaye

    Ryan Ladurantaye Active Member

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    Nice to see things up and running for you. I'm hoping to get a little time in with a hammer this weekend. I like what you've done there. The clean up while enjoyable never seems to be as much flat out fun as the forging.
    Keep it up. Nice work on the one brick too
     
  10. metal99

    metal99 Member

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    Awesome work man! How long does that little tank last you?
     
  11. Alexander13

    Alexander13 Member

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    Not really sure yet, I used all of my partial tanks first. But I'm going to have another crack at it this weekend and got some new tanks so I'll let you know for sure. I'm finally going to heat treat some knives this weekend, the two forged ones and 3 stock removal knives that I've had finished and waiting for a while now.
    Right now I'm finishing a proper metal stand that will have a built in holder for the torch/tank.
     
  12. Ryan Ladurantaye

    Ryan Ladurantaye Active Member

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    Do you plan on using the kilns at work for hear treat or are you going to try the one brick? What did you end up choosing as a quench medium?
     
  13. Alexander13

    Alexander13 Member

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    I'm going to try the one brick (with a magnet for judging temp) and a the goop from the $50 knife shop. I've got paraffin wax, lard(animal fat) and instead of hydraulic oil, I'm going to use chainsaw blade oil. It's what I have so hopefully it'll work. I'm going to try the selective edge quench that is used in the book. I'll let you know how everything turns out.
     
  14. Ryan Ladurantaye

    Ryan Ladurantaye Active Member

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    Looking forward to seeing the results. Have fun.
     
  15. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    I have heard some mixed results with the goop. You may be better off using canola, ATF or hydraulic out alone but I am interested to see the results. One bonus to canola is that if you don't get it all clean before the temper, your oven will smell like French fries not death lol
     
  16. Alexander13

    Alexander13 Member

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    Can you do edge quench with canola?
     
  17. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Edge quench is possible with canola, just use a shallow tray or a pan of some sort that is as deep as you want the quench line to be
     
  18. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    weld 2 tabs (to stand) on the ends of a piece of angle iron , 1/2 x 1/2 ?? 1 x 1 ?? whatever you like
     
  19. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    Great start they look real good.

    Another option if you can't get commercial quenchent would be veterinarian grade mineral oil. I used it until I snagged some parks 50. Just heat the oil to 120 deg before using. I found it to be a little slow so it would work great for 1084 but not as well for W2 or 1095.
     

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