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Yup Just Another New Guy Lol

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Rick Tomsett, Jan 15, 2019.

  1. Rick Tomsett

    Rick Tomsett New Member

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    Hi been a welder for 40 years and looking for something to do in my old age. looking to buy a knife making set up looking for who has the good stuff and a fair price and is there any other good forums to look at. thanks for any help any one know of a set up for sale that is not to old thanks again or I will just buy it all new.
     
  2. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Welcome to CKM, Rick.

    The kind of set up you're looking for will depend a lot on the type of blades you want to make and how you want to make them. A forging set up is different from a stock removal one. A set up for making folders is different from one for making swords and axes.

    You probably won't find everything you need or want in one place, unless you come across a maker who's retiring and selling his whole shop (it happens, but not that often). You likely already have nearly everything you need to get started making your first couple of stock removal blades -- doesn't take much more than a hacksaw, some files and a drill press. Once you know what you want to make and how you want to do it, the list of equipment you need becomes a lot clearer.
     
  3. Zoltan

    Zoltan New Member

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    Hi Rick, I was also a welder for the last 15 years or so, and those skills helped me immensely in my startup. I was especially thrilled to try out some filework on the spine of a knife. After dialing in the lands on a few thousand pipe bevels with a 14 inch half bastard, and then blasting them with 6010 never to be seen again, using a 3 inch needle file to decorate a knife that will be enjoyed for generations, is a bit more rewarding.

    Based off of plans found on Dan`s page, www.dcknives.com I built my grinder with a zip disc, hand drill, and stick welder. There is a ton of other great info for the knifemaker there. On this forum in the classified section(very bottom of main page), there was a member selling 2x72 grinders for a very reasonable price. There might be other useful equipment for sale there, or kijiji or craigslist, depending on where you are(CL seems to be more popular in BC). Forges are very easy to build, especially with the ability to weld.

    I second what Myth said above about what type of knives you want to make. Lots of great resources for knifemaking info and techniques on this forum, Dan`s page as well as other sites, and YouTube. Enjoy the journey!

    Aaron
     
  4. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Welcome Rick. Always glad to see new faces, so to speak : )

    Step 1 you've already done, signing up for this forum. Best and most helpful group of people you'll find online, no question. Then, I'd go to www.dcknives.com and read everything Dan has written about techniques, diy machines, vendors etc. He's got a tonne of info there (I think he kind of likes to show off a bit really : ) Not only is he super experienced and talented (like many of the subscribers on CKM) but he also has the rare gift of being able to document what he knows, very well. Dan's grinder plans are what really got me started. John Noon has some fantastic info as well. He also has a shop and arrangement with other artisans related to many knife making and similar crafts. Check out www.noonsknives.com and canadian-artisan.com. There's really so many nuggets from everybody. I think i've asked 3/4 of all the members a question at one time or another. Aside from that, I use knifemaker.ca a fair bit for supplies. I use various steel distributors and always looking for newer (and cheaper) places. I use the various suppliers online like usaknifemaker.com, jantzsupply.net, mossingtonknives.com etc. I'm really still scratching the surface of knifemaking myself. The others on the forum will likely have far more specific vendors they deal with for very specific needs and requirements.

    Welcome aboard and have fun!
     
  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Welcome Rick.

    Six years ago, I started with a hacksaw, vise and some files and sandpaper. Shortly thereafter a giant swirling black hole appeared in my shop where my wallet used to be. No, seriously being handy you can likely make almost everything you need, grinder, forge or heat treatment oven. Some people like making tools, but I understand that making tools is not everyone's bag. Rob at Canadian Knifemaker Supply offers grinders and heat treat ovens, shipping from Alberta.
     
  6. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Welcome Rick .
    Knifemakeing is a blast but be warn it might cost you a small fortune lol.
    Rob is a good place To start.
     
  7. Rick Tomsett

    Rick Tomsett New Member

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    Thanks guys for the help was looking at the grinders over at CKS I do not mind buying a few good things to get started whats better than the other and why lol i'm just getting ready to head out to camp for work so I will be hit and miss on here but hope we have some internet out there to look up some of this info you have given me. thanks again
     
  8. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Hi Rick,

    If I was getting started again, I would grab a foot of 1084 steel, cut out the shape, drill the holes, file down the bevels and have a go at heat treating it. Heat treatment is fairly forgiving with 1084. Often a decent torch, a couple of fire bricks and a gallon of canola oil will get you started. There's a great primer on heat treating here: http://www.canadianknifemaker.ca/index.php?threads/heat-treating-primer.84/ After you have the steel cleaned up, pin and epoxy some nice scales on and shape the handle until it feels great to hold. Sharpen it up and use it like you mean it. Cut things, paper, rope, wood, tomatoes. If the blade geometry is there your knife will cut through all the above with ease. If the heat treatment process worked out, I have a feeling you'll be very impressed with the steel. You will learn more about the craft making your first knife than the next four knives you make combined. Soak it all in and enjoy. Don't be surprised if you feel the need to start #2 right away. This is the addictive nature of making useful tools from raw materials.

    If you planning on forging you're going to need a forge and an anvil of some sort. Propane is convenient for forging and discarded tanks can be fabricated into forges pretty easily. Venturi burners can be made from hardware store parts or you can order them pre-made online. Some kind of anvil is a required to pound the heated steel into shape. These range from hunks of railway track to the real deal. The real deals are heavy and proportionally expensive.

    There are two basic configurations for belt grinders; direct drive and belt drive. Looking at CKS's website you'll see the BEE models are direct drive and the KMG is a belt drive. Having the drive wheel directly connected to the motor gets more power to the abrasive belt and lessens vibrations. However, having stepped pulleys on a belt drive allows for some different pulley ratios and a crude way to adjust speed. Always a trade-off. By all accounts the BEE machines are very well made and have the guards and a dust collection port in place. Both of my homemade grinders are 2 horsepower and I find this is plenty for grinding knives and general fabrication tasks. One question I get asked a lot is, "Do I need variable speed?" Short answer is no. Variable speed is useful for slowing down the belt speed when using small wheels. This would be one situation where I'd change the pulley ratio on the KMG. Otherwise, I run at good clip (in the 4000 SFM range) for all other grinding and polishing chores. As for tool attachments, a flat platen and a work rest are pretty standard and will get you started.

    As a welder, you likely have a 240 V supply in your shop. So there shouldn't be a major issue getting some 240 V receptacles installed if you don't already have a few.

    For heat treatment, the method you use depends on the steel you choose. Simple carbon steels like 1084 can be successfully heat treated in a gas forge. More complex alloy (stainless) steels like 154CM or AEB-L really need precise temperature control. This is where an electric furnace (oven) is going to help by holding the temperature steady for a period of time to allow the magic in the steel to happen. Lots of makers start with 10xx steel and move into alloy steels as their craft progresses.

    Any new knifemaker would be ecstatic to have a KMG grinder and an EvenHeat oven. You will certainly use both of these tools whether you are forging or doing stock removal. Lots of other things make a great knife shop; good lighting, a solid vise, a drill press and a vertical metal cutting band saw will all get plenty of use. Oh and don't forget your respirator.

    Good luck,

    Dan
     
  9. Rick Tomsett

    Rick Tomsett New Member

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    so would you buy the Bee for a grinder. I look foreword to looking at your web page and if any one has any good links on how to make a knife on you tub vids and how to do this and that lol that would be nice in camp the WF is not so good for searching thanks again for all the help
     
  10. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    @Rick Tomsett I have a Bee. Bought it years ago from knifemaker.ca. It's been reliable and easy to work with. Mine is variable speed and I use that feature quite a bit.
     
  11. Rick Tomsett

    Rick Tomsett New Member

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  12. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    For the wheel size I would go 10 inch but depending on what you plan on doing. I 99% flat grind these days so wheels is not a big deal . I have 10 8 and 5 inch wheels each as it’s place . A good set of small wheels is very good investment. Bee to me is a ok grinder .I owned one . Today there are better choices out there. TDM grinders if he’s still doing them. Northridge grinder Tw90 and there is a guy in BC making grinders he’s on here sometimes to me all better than the bee. But each his own. That bandsaw looks good to me but if your buying steel in bar stock you can get cheaper. They normally are not that good for wood don’t turn fast enough .But if you plan on buying sheets of steel and cut it up I say yes get it. Two saw are better.
    The down side to the bee is it’s tooling arm and how it’s made. Small wheel attachment is more important and able to change things out fast is a big help.
    Today I have 10 grinders in my shop and none are Bee .
     
  13. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Will I’ll back track on that band saw a little.I just looked at the spec and it does have the speed for wood my mistake.
     
  14. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    For the grinder in BC check out. Vashti tactical design group. There on Facebook
     
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  15. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    The bandsaw looks like a good deal if you want to go that route of a floor standing model. The comparable one from BusyBeeTools (Metal and Wood) is way more at $2699.00 on sale :confused: regular $3299.00 seen here

    https://www.busybeetools.com/products/vertical-wood-metal-bandsaw-18in-cx-series-cx101.html

    You can go this route (the one I went and a few makers have)
    Milwaukee Deep Cut portable band saw $398.00 Canadian
    https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.deep-cut-variable-speed-band-saw-kit.1000743177.html

    And you can then get a stand from SWAG off-road (or fabricate one yourself)
    http://www.swagoffroad.com/SWAG-V40-Portaband-Table_p_63.html

    Tossing my hat in the ring on a grinder I think the Reeder Products Grinder is tops. It’s going to be my choice once my wallet recouperates from turning my garage into a shop lol! Their tracking wheel adjusts on different axis so you can successfully run the motor in reverse without the belt slipping off. Tons on vids on YouTube showing the grinder and it’s various accessories. The cons are having ordering from the states: exchange rate, shipping costs, import costs and the dreaded tax once it hits our side!

    https://reederproducts.com/

    Hope this helps, but it probably won’t as it can be overwhelming making a decision when there’s so many great options lol!

    :beer: Griff
     
  16. Rick Tomsett

    Rick Tomsett New Member

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    Im getting the one from BC it looks nice but what do I know lol price was good and I like to keep the money in Canada if I can thanks for the help he will be putting it up on his face book page when its done thanks again
     
  17. Rick Tomsett

    Rick Tomsett New Member

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    I think Im going for the band saw to I have a lot of nice wood that will need to be re cut so it should see a bit of work now to watch some vids to see what is still needed to make retirement better
     
  18. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Good drill press
    Disc grinder helps

    And a good set up for the lovely thing called hand sanding lol.
    For handle pin I use carbon ones today so much easier than steel ones.
    If your on Facebook look me up I’ll send you a few videos of my set up. I’ll be back home in a week .
    Kevin cox sept îles Québec
    Kcknives
    and you’ll find me on Instagram under kcknives to.
     
  19. Rick Tomsett

    Rick Tomsett New Member

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    ordered the band saw to day this is like xmas lol would like to find a anvil on Vancouver Island if any one know of one still need the find a forge was looking at this but not sure yet
    https://mightyforge.com/#warrior
    thanks for all the help guys
     
  20. Magnus

    Magnus New Member

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    I ordered a mighty forge and have been using it for about the last 4 years. Overall, I'm pretty happy with it - it easily achieves welding temps, it's pretty quiet and is reasonable on fuel usage. Mine doesn't get hot enough to burn steel (it's a two burner) but the one you linked might get hotter so you may have to be careful. I found Lorne to be excellent to deal with; he patiently answered all my questions and provided some alterations at no charge (I asked him to increase the side port sides to 2" x 4" - this better accommodates hammer blanks and taller damascus billets).

    I think it's a better build quality than a lot of the commercially available forges and if you're close by you'll save a fortune on shipping.

    Magnus
     
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