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Straightenator

Discussion in 'Jigs & Holders' started by dancom, Jul 25, 2014.

  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I had a fairly thin 13" blade bow on me a little during heat treatment. I learned that blades can be straightened post heat treat by applying pressure and maintaining some heat.

    After a lot of fiddling around with C clamps and a file, reckoned there must be some better way. I came up with a thingama-jig I dubbed the 'Straightenator.' It's a piece of steel strut with holes drilled, nuts welded on. I have a series of 1/4 bolts to direct the blade where I want it to go. So into the tempering oven it goes.

    [​IMG]

    It made for a great save. I hope that I never have to use it again!

    Cheers!

    Dan
     
  2. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    Did you have to compensate for spring back or did it stay where you set it after it cooled.
     
  3. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    On the AEB-L, I over compensated slightly, tossed it in the oven @185°C for a few hours, switched the oven off and let it cool down under pressure. Worked beautifully.
     
  4. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    I use a block of micarta cut in 2 pieces in the shape of a crescent
    I then embedded magnets on the flats (ends) and it sits in my vise , post temper straighten if required
    Short or long can do'em all
     
  5. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    Another fella I know uses a rasp with a slight bend for compensation , clamp your blade to it and in the oven she goes
     
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    The issue, I understand (from Ray Rogers) is that stainless requires heat, fairly long times and incremental adjustments. Although I didn't experience that with AEB-L, Ray was suggesting 4 to 6 hours in the oven with increasing force every hour or so, then slow cooling. I tried a large file with c-clamps, round stock, etc. Handling everything hot was a PITA!
     

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