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New And Looking For Help

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by jrlndy, Dec 13, 2018.

  1. jrlndy

    jrlndy New Member

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    Hi,

    First off let me just say that if this post isn't approved I apologize and please remove it. I looked at the forum rules and didn't see anything about this

    I live in the GTA in Ontario and I've been trying to find someone that has the ability, knowledge, and tools to make me a custom knife. Long story short, I found 2 old knives that my deceased grandfather had made and would like for someone to either total rework them, or deconstruct them and include them in a new knife as a gift to my mother.

    If there is anyone on here that could help or point me in the right direction I would be very grateful. As I said I've struggled to find anyone that can actually do something like this online.

    Many Thanks
     
  2. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Welcome to Canadian Knifemaker. That sounds like a nice idea. Maybe you could tell us a little more about the knives, perhaps share a couple of pictures (there's information about how to add photo's here). The more information we have the easier it will be for someone to determine how best to help you.
     
  3. jrlndy

    jrlndy New Member

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    Great idea, and thanks for the reply

    I don't know a great deal about the knives, unfortunately. They are probably around 30-40 years old and are very rudimentary. My grandfather worked in a steel factory and it looks like he made them for his own use. The steel is in rough shape and the handles are poorly constructed as well. I was hoping to either salvage one of them (or parts of them) and turn them into a chef's knife or something that style.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    I'm not sure you'll be able to make a traditional chef's knife from one of them. Going from the photos, the spine to edge distance doesn't look wide enough. However, depending on how much steel there is to work with (thickness), either or both could be turned into a useful knife for the kitchen.

    Now for my two pennies worth:
    I understand wanting to preserve your grandfather's knives. But what you are suggesting will effectively erase everything about those that made them his knives. If it was me, I would rather clean up both knives, without changing their unique characteristics. That's something that you could do yourself, with some good quality sandpaper and some time. You could start with some 60 grit paper to remove the surface rust and patina, then work up to 800 or 1500 grit to give you a bright, new-looking blade that still retains some of the little pits and imperfections that show it's age and origin.

    The same can be done with the handles. With a couple of inexpensive rasps and files from your local Canadian Tire or Home Hardware, along with a selection of sandpaper grits, you could smooth and even reshape the handles. Polish them up with a good car wax (they work surprisingly well) or soak them in some boiled linseed oil and you'd be amazed at the difference. A kitchen store should be able to sharpen them up for you. The result is a gift for your mother that not only retains character of your grandfather's knives, but adds your own effort that spans the generations.

    Just something to consider.
     
    krash-bang likes this.
  5. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    I agree with Myth on this one I think. I love the sentiment behind your idea for sure. But I think there's something special about the age and condition of them too. It's like they earned those nicks and stains etc. My 2 cents would be to save the existing knives nearly as is (clean them up as much as you like) and then make something new along the same lines. You could use the same wood and try to mimic as much of the geometry etc. that made sense. Sort of the 2.0 version of the same knife.

    Whichever direction you go, good on you for the overall idea.
     
  6. jrlndy

    jrlndy New Member

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    Hi, and thank you for the thoughtful response's. I appreciate you taking the time to weigh in with your opinion.

    I know that realistically there isn't much that can be done with these knives given their current form. Unfortunately, I don't really see myself or family members being able to use these on a consistent basis given their shape and quality. And while I can appreciate the sentiment about preserving them as is, I would rather try and turn them into something that can be used everyday as opposed to a keepsake that stuffed away in a drawer most of the year.

    Please forgive my ignorance on the subject, but is it possible to melt these knives down, and include them with new steel to make an entirely new knife? Or perhaps break down the steel and run it along the handle somehow? I really would love to have something new that's created while using something old or incorporating these older knives in someway. For me, being able to use them on a regular basis, and still have the essence and reminder of him would truly be something special.
     
  7. Zoltan

    Zoltan New Member

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    That is very special to have something that a family member made. As far as reworking them into new knives, anything is possible. Yes, they could be melted down and remade that way, a more simple process might be to simply fold them back on themselves, forge weld, and re-forge into the desired profile. Since there is ample handle material and steel, I believe all original parts(maybe minus the pins), could be used.
     

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