1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Hand Sanding

Discussion in 'Working the Steel' started by Grahamm, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Sorry in advance for all the newbie questions that I'm likely gonna send today. Had lots of shop time yesterday which got me thinking about some stuff.

    How much time do you spend hand sanding? I spent about an hour per blade yesterday and after 3 blades I had enough. I'm just using the hardware store gator paper from 3M (I think). It seems to take forever to get all the grinder marks out with 80 grit before I go on to finer. I was only going to a satin 320 finish.

    I am sure that a better grinder with finer belts would help a lot. I went to 180 on my 4x36 which is all I have to work with but is there something I can do to speed this up? Any advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    542
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I take it down to 400 with the belt sander then 400 at 90 degrees and work up to 2000 grit before buffing. Time spent is far to long to be honest and wish I had a little power sander
     
  3. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    820
    Trophy Points:
    113
    An hour a blade sounds about right. I sometimes put it on the buffer with some black compound and reveal any scratches, then get back to sanding where needed. Be sure to flush the paper with water/Windex/WD-40 or whatever you are using. Galing will set you back, so keep the sandpaper clean. Don't be afraid to jump down a grit to work some scratches out.

    I have started using conditioning belts to reduce or eliminate hand sanding. (Others will use a cork belt charged with abrasive compound.) This creates a brushed look. It depends on the look you are going for.

    Dan
     
    Icho- likes this.
  4. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    152
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Dan pretty much nailed my process also. Even if I am not going for a mirror finish I take it to the buffer to high light any scratches that may need special attention.
     
    dancom and John Noon like this.
  5. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    542
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I was doing the buffing thing and thought I was the odd ball out. Now feel much better :)
     
  6. boatbuilder

    boatbuilder New Member

    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I will go to 220 on grinder to clean up plunges. Then will go to my disc grinder to clean up scratches to 800 grit. Then will hand sand with 600 grit for finish. I have the Neilsen disc grinder that is absolutely precision made and it has saved me so much hand sanding time.
     
    Grahamm likes this.
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    820
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Jim, do you use a lapping lubricant when finishing the blades on the disc?

    Dan
     
  8. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

    Likes Received:
    228
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I've gotten to like hand sanding. I find it strangely meditative and I prefer the satin finish of hand sanding to buffed.

    I go to 220 on the grinder and then up to 1500 by hand over several days. I spend about an hour per grit (approximately the time it takes to use up a sheet). If it's not a full flat grind, I'll often hand sand the blank to 600-800 before grinding the bevels.
     
  9. boatbuilder

    boatbuilder New Member

    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I don't use any lapping lubricant. I dip the blade in water to keep blade cool which ends up on sandpaper that is attached to disc. I find that the paper cuts much better dry than wet. I've been using Norton black ice for many years and when I run out I want to try Rynowet sandpaper. I also have numerous removable discs for my disc grinder. That way I can switch grits without pulling off a good sheet and wasting it. I can just switch complete disc.
    Also seem like when the sandpaper gets wet it leaves stray deep scratches to often.
     
    dancom likes this.
  10. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I checked out the Neilson website. Boy do they have some room for additional information... Got the basic idea but would still like to see a bit more detail on what this offers. I'm sure it works great.
     
  11. boatbuilder

    boatbuilder New Member

    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    i contacted the fellow and told him about this discussion. Hope he shows up.
    I just finished grinding a Stainless steel Damascus blade on this disc grinder to 1200 grit. Now I can go back to 800 or 1000 hand sand before etch. Should not take long. Variable speed ( I never go over 20%. Seems to cut way better at slow speed) disc grinder has saved me many hours of hand sanding.
     
  12. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    28
    That's good of you to let him know we are taking about his product. Sounds like a very small company then which sort of makes sense. I'm liking the idea of not having to do as much hand sanding of I can help it. Thanks.
     
  13. Rod Nielsen

    Rod Nielsen New Member

    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Feel free to give me a call, I can tell you lots about the disc. As far as the website goes I hope to be posting a video soon. My number is 250-377-3883. Or I can call you as well
    Rod
     
    dancom and Grahamm like this.
  14. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Thanks Rod. I will try to find a minute this week and follow up with you.
     
  15. Rod Nielsen

    Rod Nielsen New Member

    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Ok sounds good!
    I am usually home from work after 6pm pacific time.
    Take care
    Rod
     

Share This Page