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Great Read On Heat Treating And Metallurgy

Discussion in 'Heat Treating' started by dancom, May 17, 2018 at 1:46 PM.

  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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  2. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    So, I decided to watch his comprehensive videos on YouTube that compliment his page, and I came away with this thought, 'I haven't even begun to heat treat my knives and I am already doing it wrong!' :confused:

    It's a real eye opener. I am going to be even more selective when it comes to steel when I am able to start knife making again after the house move in June. I had considered D2 until Mr. Fisher enlightened me to the fact to get the uttermost best out of D2 it needs cryogenic temperatures beyond dry ice, -150, where dry ice he says depending on how it was stored and packaged can be anywhere from -80 to -120, and in his mind -120 doesn't cut it!

    Anyway I am going to keep watching....
     
  3. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    I love Fisher's stuff. That said, it's easy to get blinded by science. Especially when you are starting out and have a limited toolset, a tiny corner of a garage or shed to work in, KISS is still your best guide. Keep to simple carbon steels, heat to non-magnetic, and you've got a useful, dependable blade. Once you get better at making knives and are ready to take things to the next level, then you can start to put some of this knowledge to work.
     
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  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I got started down the rabbit hole when I read some posts over on BladeForums where a poster was saying that Nitro-V won't harden without a cryo treatment. There is so much rubbish out there it's good to have a little science background so one can sniff the whooey before they step in it. Last night I heat treated and tempered two chefs knives in Nitro-V, sans cryo. They seem plenty hard to me.
     
  5. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    The whole series of videos is passive aggressive commentary on how Jay Fisher perceives the knife making community. He's very clear about his distaste for simple carbon steels, how they are processed in an average knife shop, and then at the same time casts doubt on any other knife maker who isn't set up like he is to Heat-treat/ Cryo-treat hypereutectoid steels.

    There's so many levels to what is going on with Jay Fishers page and videos. It is the very best intentions of a master knife maker to both heat and freeze his knives to a level that scientifically proves they will be the best knives on the planet wrapped around a certain amount of disdain for other knifemakers (though probably not those he considers peers, just regular schmucks)! There's no other way to say it, its how he was coming off. At one point he clearly states he doesn't share any of this knowledge for the benefit of other knifemakers, he's doing it to educate the customer by basically saying, 'If they don't do it like I do it, then their knives are garbage,' and so its here were you can feel his contempt.

    For a fairly new knife maker such as myself this whole Jay Fisher thing was daunting, because I want to make knives made from all steels, and to the level that Jay Fisher prides himself on (I think we all do). If my skin were a bit thinner though I would have hung up my grinder by video #4 lol!
     
  6. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    I think you're right in much of what you're saying, @Griff. While much of Fisher's arrogance comes well-earned, he is definitely promoting his brand. Nevertheless, he does provide a wealth of information that any maker can learn from, when they decide to move down that path with more exotic steels.
     
  7. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    @Mythtaken That part in his video where he says he doesn't share information for other makers is sad. The reason I got into this in the first place was because how open other knife makers are at sharing their knowledge, and are usually quite humble doing so...the fact that the majority of the community work and share information to make us all better knife makers - which makes the quality in the craft better overall- is far more creatively productive.
     

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