1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

First Knife 1084 Or 1075

Discussion in 'Materials & Technique' started by Daniel P, Mar 7, 2019.

  1. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I plan to order some steel from Canadian Knife
    What should i get for my first go at this adventure...1075 0r 1084

    Also I should order pin stock...what would you suggest.

    Daniel P
    New apprentice to the Dark side
     
  2. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    230
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I've always understood 1084 to be the "best first steel" to learn on. But, having said that, I've always like 01 myself and I could find it a lot easier (metal supermarket carries it, for example). Don't do what I did and start out using steel that's too thick.

    Pin stock, that's a tough one. I can't imagine there being a huge difference from one type of pin to the next. When I first started I just bought a few feet of 1/8" stainless. I wouldn't go too crazy with the first few knives with the decorative pins or carbon fiber or anything. I'll let somebody else jump in for a better answer. (I tend to use anything that's straight and metallic-ish for pins, I like to "upcycle" stuff - and i'm cheap : )
     
  3. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thanks Todd,
    I like the look of stainless with Black Walnut
    I’m going to order some along with solid brass.
    The 1084 sounds like a good material to start out with.
    I know for sure I’m going to make a kitchen veggie cutting knife... what type of stainless should I get for the blade?
    Cheers
    Daniel
     
  4. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    113
    One thing I liked about 1084 was the black finish it took on with cold bluing.

    before heat treating 600 grit finish, coat with anti-scale compound
    heat treat
    sand at 600 again up to 800 or 2000
    coat with cold bluing
    temper for two hours
    steel wool 0000 or similar to buff surface
    coat with cold bluing
    temper second time
    steel wool 0000 or similar to buff surface
    coat with beeswax or mineral oil

    Should look like black chrome or pretty close.
     
  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    891
    Trophy Points:
    113
    For a kitchen knife I would use some CPM154 for chef's knife. For smaller kitchen knives like paring and utilities I like AEB-L. Although 1084 will make a fine kitchen knife, it will take some care to keep it looking good. Or you can force a patina on it and go with the dark look. Or as John suggested try bluing it.

    Dan
     
  6. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Great
    Thanks for the tips
    Waiting on the grinder still
    So I will be using the cheeper material for awhile
    I ordered 2 feet of the Nitro ... hope it will work as well.
    I just need to figure out how to post pictures on here

    Cheers

    Daniel
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    891
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Hi Daniel,

    Nitro-V is great steel for a kitchen knife. It's a bit tricky to heat treat though. Do you have an electric heat-treatment setup?

    Dan
     
  8. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi Dan,

    No heat treating gear here

    I plan to build a propane forge later on.

    I should have checked with you guys before I ordered the stainless
    I do have 1084 on route with the grinder as well.
    I cut a pail load of 1/2” thick figured maple and walnut handle material

    Daniel
     
  9. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    891
    Trophy Points:
    113
    For 1084 you can handily heat treat that with a forge, some oil and an old toaster oven. I would try the 1084 and give it a mustard patina. The patina will reduce/prevent rusting on the steel's surface. This occurs naturally over time with foods that are acidic, but one can force it to happen quickly with vinegars, mustards & different acids. This is very cool and fun to do.

    You can always send the Nitro-V blade(s) out for heat treatment. I believe that Rob at Canadian Knifemaker Supply is still offering that service. There should also be other places closer to home that will heat treat for you. As long as they know the steel composition they should be able to dial in the heat treatment to match your desired hardness. 58 to 59 on the Rockwell C scale is what I try for.

    The first knife I ever made was from S30V and I tried heat treating it in my propane forge. The results were not good. After that I built my own electric heat treatment oven and have been running with that ever since.

    Dan
     
  10. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Pin stock I pick up at home Depot or welding shop and get TIG filler metal
     
  11. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thanks for that Mr Noon
    I have lots of tig rod
    Would have never thought of that

    Cheers

    Daniel
     
    John Noon likes this.
  12. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    113
    For hollow and solid pins look into arrows and kite shafts as well
     
  13. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    230
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Those are some great tips John.
     

Share This Page