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9" Clip Cheffy

Discussion in 'Fixed Blades' started by dancom, Jun 3, 2018.

  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I know, yup, another boring chef knife. This is a 9" with a slightly clipped point featuring a stabilized blue dyed curly maple handle with brass and black accoutrements. The owner has larger than normal hands so the girth and length of the handle reflect this.
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    The grind is a gentle S grind right side only.
    [​IMG]

    You never know what's inside a block when you dive into it. That's the beauty of wood.
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    [​IMG]

    Magnified shot of the edge. I took it down to 0.015" then cut a 17° secondary bevel and stropped.
    [​IMG]

    I've used this in the kitchen for a week preparing a couple dozen meals and it's not showing any edge issues. The steel has a certain "shhhh-ting" sound to it. It occasionally sounds like a movie sword fight.

    Now I have to clean it up and hand it over. The next Nitro-V blades will be cryo treated for comparison.

    Thanks for looking!

    Dan
     
  2. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    Nothing boring about something beautifully hand crafted Dan. ;)
     
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  3. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Yaaawwwwnnnnn.... such a boring, perfectly finished, completely hand-made, reliable, dependable, beautiful chef knife. Besides, I would contend that a chef knife gets 10x the use of a "survival" knife or a hunter. Unless you're like tarzan or maybe crocodile dundee or something they get used more than any other knife. That's saying something right?

    Beauty knife Dan. But, I kinda hate that your "boring" knives are so much nicer than my "super exciting" knives. I seriously have a complex about even posting pictures to you guys.
     
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  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Thanks guys. I am pretty much resigned to the fact that I will be making kitchen knives for a while. I have seven (7) more to make. :eek:

    That bat knife is going to have to wait.

    Dan
     
  5. FORGE

    FORGE Maker of the Year Best Knife

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    Dan, Great looking knife....!!!!!!
    How do you like that single side grind ?
    That is the only way I will make a kitchen knife anymore.
     
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Thanks Cal. The right-side S grind is simply a dream to cut with. Having the slight indentation lets things fall right off, even cheddar cheese doesn't stick to the blade like a true flat grind. I tested this one out for a week and realise I really need to make one for myself.
     
  7. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    Beautiful knife nothing boring about that one.
     
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  8. cuatroXcuatro

    cuatroXcuatro Active Member

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    Boring, so terribly boring, that and not having the cheese stick to the blade would leave me so disappointed.
    Sarcasm aside, I wouldn't even know how to attempt an S grind.
     
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  9. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I use the contact wheel to slightly scallop a groove that runs about 3/4 the length of the blade. Starting from the heel and working towards the tip and is parallel to the cutting edge. To finish the groove I use conditioning belts on the same diameter contact wheel. This type of grind makes the knife a joy to use as wet foods stick less than a straight flat grind.

    [​IMG]

    Dan
     
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  10. Steve Syncox

    Steve Syncox New Member

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    Bea you tea fool.
     
  11. parker

    parker Active Member

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    Beautiful work
     
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  12. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    @dancom You are the first person I heard about the 'S' grind from, and I am happy to hear you use a contact wheel as as I looked into it, it looked like you have to have a special Platen.

    Just recently Alec Steel posted a video of him attempting a 'S' grind and unfortunately screwing it up! That's okay it will make for a more entertaining follow up episode, but he crafted his own curved platen. The only place I've seen those kinds of planten's is from an Australian supplier here:

    https://www.artisansupplies.com.au/product/radius-platen-48/?c=22783a5940ef

     
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  13. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Yes, radiusing platens emulate very large diameter wheels. For cleaner, tighter S grind I would prefer a smaller diameter wheel, say 6". Currently I have no contact wheels between a 2" and 10" diameter. The 10" does an okay job, but a smaller wheel would let one make a nice pronounced scoop within the 2" of blade height. The 12" wheel I used makes an ok trough.

    Another grind which is more common in Japanese cutlery has a large radius grind on the backside of the blade and a single bevel flat on the opposite side. This would benefit from a large diameter wheel or radiusing platen. Or you can "rock the contact" to make a large radius grind there. This is my next adventure.

    [​IMG]

    Dan
     
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